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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As of Monday evening, 407,024 people have registered to vote on Snapchat, according to data reported within the app.

The big picture: With seven weeks still to go until the election, Snapchat has already registered nearly as many voters as it did in 2018.

  • The company said that in 2018, more than half of the users that registered to vote via Snapchat actually went out and cast ballots.
  • The vast majority of Snapchat's user base is under 30 years old.

Details: A Snapchat spokesperson confirmed that the number, made visible within the app's "Register to Vote" portal, represents the total tally of users that have registered to vote on the app.

  • The company just launched its Voter Registration "Mini" last week, a new feature that allows users to register to vote directly in Snapchat.
  • It has also begun pushing users to register from within its news shows, like its political show "Good Luck America" and its daily news show with NowThis News.
  • The number could grow much higher. The spokesperson notes the company has yet to debut most of its bigger voter promotions on and off the app.

On Tuesday, President Obama will be featured in a new Snapchat PSA that encourages first-time and young voters to register to vote on Snapchat.

  • The PSA is part of a larger, nonpartisan public awareness effort Snapchat will launch in the coming weeks to get users to register to vote.
  • In the coming weeks, former Ohio governor and Republican presidential nominee John Kasich will also appear in a PSA, as well as a broad array of high profile celebrities, athletes, musicians and influencers, including Arnold Schwarzenegger, Snoop Dogg, Catherine McBroom, and Quincy Brown.

What's next: National Voter Registration Day is September 22.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

67,000 felons registered to vote after Florida restored their rights

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

67,000 people registered to vote after Florida restored voting rights to most felons in a 2018 ballot initiative, Politico reports.

Why it matters: Election results in the battleground state — which previously instituted a lifetime voting ban for people with felony convictions — could come down to these 67,000 votes. But the number still falls well short of the 1.4 million people that community organizers hoped to register.

2 hours ago - Health

Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note ±3.3% margin of error for the total sample size; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

About half of Americans are worried that trick-or-treating will spread coronavirus in their communities, according to this week's installment of the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: This may seem like more evidence that the pandemic is curbing our nation's cherished pastimes. But a closer look reveals something more nuanced about Americans' increased acceptance for risk around activities in which they want to participate.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.