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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As of Monday evening, 407,024 people have registered to vote on Snapchat, according to data reported within the app.

The big picture: With seven weeks still to go until the election, Snapchat has already registered nearly as many voters as it did in 2018.

  • The company said that in 2018, more than half of the users that registered to vote via Snapchat actually went out and cast ballots.
  • The vast majority of Snapchat's user base is under 30 years old.

Details: A Snapchat spokesperson confirmed that the number, made visible within the app's "Register to Vote" portal, represents the total tally of users that have registered to vote on the app.

  • The company just launched its Voter Registration "Mini" last week, a new feature that allows users to register to vote directly in Snapchat.
  • It has also begun pushing users to register from within its news shows, like its political show "Good Luck America" and its daily news show with NowThis News.
  • The number could grow much higher. The spokesperson notes the company has yet to debut most of its bigger voter promotions on and off the app.

On Tuesday, President Obama will be featured in a new Snapchat PSA that encourages first-time and young voters to register to vote on Snapchat.

  • The PSA is part of a larger, nonpartisan public awareness effort Snapchat will launch in the coming weeks to get users to register to vote.
  • In the coming weeks, former Ohio governor and Republican presidential nominee John Kasich will also appear in a PSA, as well as a broad array of high profile celebrities, athletes, musicians and influencers, including Arnold Schwarzenegger, Snoop Dogg, Catherine McBroom, and Quincy Brown.

What's next: National Voter Registration Day is September 22.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

TikTok beefs up parental controls

Photo illustration: Mateusz Slodkowski/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.

TikTok is expanding the ways parents can control how their children use the video-sharing app, according to a company blog post Tuesday.

The big picture: TikTok has sought to position itself as a fun and safe portal in the face of political headwinds over its Chinese ownership and as it watches more established peers wrestle with thorny content moderation challenges.

America's Chinese communities struggle with online disinformation

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Disinformation has proliferated on Chinese-language websites and platforms like WeChat that are popular with Chinese speakers in the U.S., just as it has on English-language websites.

Why it matters: There are fewer fact-checking sites and other sources of reliable information in Chinese, making it even harder to push back against disinformation.