Snap plans to publicly file to go public next week, according to a report from tech news site Recode, citing an anonymous source. Snap declined to comment.

Snap, the parent company of the popular ephemeral messaging app Snapchat, reportedly confidentially filed for an IPO in November, so its financials have yet to be made public. The company is reportedly seeking a valuation as high as $25 billion through its IPO, but demand from investors could push it higher.

Big deal: Snap's IPO will be the first from a high-profile company this year. AppDynamics' was canceled at the very last minute earlier this week after it sold to Cisco for $3.7 billion.

There are still questions about whether Snap's business will impress investors—check out the bearish and bullish takes published on Axios this week.

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Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Retail traders drove Snowflake and Unity Software's IPO surges

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The story of last week's Snowflake and Unity Software IPOs had little to do with data warehousing or 3D game development, and lots to do with dizzying "pops" after pricing.

What happened: The Robinhood effect.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 31,103,347 — Total deaths: 961,435— Total recoveries: 21,281,441Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 6,813,984 — Total deaths: 199,525 — Total recoveries: 2,590,671 — Total tests: 95,108,559Map.
  3. Health: CDC updates guidances to say coronavirus can be spread through the air Nursing homes are evicting unwanted patients.
  4. Politics: Testing czar on Trump's CDC contradictions: "Everybody is right."
  5. Education: College students give failing grade on return to campus.
  6. Business: Unemployment concerns are growing.
  7. World: "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.
Ben Geman, author of Generate
3 hours ago - Energy & Environment

The climate stakes of the Supreme Court fight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death and the battle over her vacant Supreme Court seat have real implications for energy and climate policy.

Why it matters: If President Trump replaces her, the court will likely become more skeptical of regulations that claim expansive federal power to regulate carbon under existing law, and perhaps new climate statutes as well.