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Variety co-editor-in-chief Andrew Wallenstein with comedian and producer Wanda Sykes. Photo: Alison Yin/Variety/Shutterstock

On Tuesday, a number of Hollywood and NYC execs shared a stage with their Silicon Valley counterparts at an event hosted by Variety magazine to discuss how their worlds collide. It was cheekily named "Silicon Valleywood."

The big picture: As tech providers get into the content business and the content makers spin up their own streaming services, Hollywood and Silicon Valley are looking to learn from each other — and even unite for shared battles.

What they're saying: "If we let a group of regulators in Washington or in Brussels regulate how we distribute content … we're all a little screwed," Viacom Digital Studios president Kelly Day said at the event.

More from the event's discussions:

1. Business models: "We're looking at companies with multiple revenue streams," said Comcast Ventures managing director Amy Banse during a panel. "Advertising is certainly one … but we're seeing companies come out with subscriptions, e-commerce."

  • And while online streaming has been all the rage, some execs admitted that the economics are still challenging and that it's unclear exactly how many (or few) services consumers will ultimately want to pay for.

2. Data: While helpful in identifying underserved audiences, for example, it won't dictate individual elements of a piece of content, Snap head of content strategy Mike DiBenedetto said during a storytelling panel, with other execs agreeing with him.

3. Screen talent: "Now there's just more opportunities, more avenues," comedian and producer Wanda Sykes said of the effect of new distribution channels like Netflix.

  • "Broadcast and cable, it was about their audience and what they were looking for ... But now, it's just 'go for it' — and hopefully somebody will be into this." (Sykes has a comedy special coming up on Netflix.)

Flashback: Variety's event came just a month after Apple hosted some of Hollywood's biggest stars at its own Silicon Valley press event to unveil its TV ambitions.

Go deeper: Silicon Valley gets ready for its closeup amid privacy scandals

Go deeper

Collins helps contractor before pro-Susan PAC gets donation

Sen. Susan Collins during her reelection campaign. Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

A PAC backing Sen. Susan Collins in her high-stakes reelection campaign received $150,000 from an entity linked to the wife of a defense contractor whose firm Collins helped land a federal contract, new public records show.

Why it matters: The executive, Martin Kao of Honolulu, leaned heavily on his political connections to boost his business, federal prosecutors say in an ongoing criminal case against him. The donation linked to Kao was veiled until last week.

How cutting GOP corporate cash could backfire

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Companies pulling back on political donations, particularly to members of Congress who voted against certifying President Biden's election win, could inadvertently push Republicans to embrace their party's rightward fringe.

Why it matters: Scores of corporate PACs have paused, scaled back or entirely abandoned their political giving programs. While designed to distance those companies from events that coincided with this month's deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol, research suggests the moves could actually empower the far-right.

6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Scoop: Kaine, Collins pitch Senate colleagues on censuring Trump

Sen. Tim Kaine speaks with Sen. Susan Collins. Photo: Andrew Harnik/AP via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine and Susan Collins are privately pitching their colleagues on a bipartisan resolution censuring former President Trump, three sources familiar with the discussions tell Axios.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction in his second impeachment.