Rep. Bob Goodlatte. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

An anti-trafficking bill won the House's approval Tuesday despite a scramble by internet companies to slow it down in the final hours before the vote.

Why it matters: The 388-25 vote to pass the bill was a striking defeat for Big Tech in Washington as the industry is fighting more battles than ever. It now heads to the Senate and, if it passes, seems likely to get Trump's signature.

The bill that passed on Tuesday combined a House proposal that many in tech approved of with language from the Senate that worried some internet companies. The say the measure makes it easier to sue online platforms over user-generated content.

What we’re hearing:

  • Some tech groups scrambled over the last week to slow the progress of the legislative package. On Tuesday they questioned the process by which the Senate language was added to the legislation and drew attention to a final-hours letter from the Department of Justice raising concerns about one aspect of the bill.
  • "This last-minute letter from the Department of Justice is a clear signal that this bill has been rushed to the floor," said Evan Engstrom, the Executive Director of startup advocacy organization Engine. “There are serious concerns lawmakers must address to help law enforcement, tech companies and victims' groups end the heinous crime of sex trafficking."
  • House Judiciary Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) also declined to either recommend or advise against a vote on the package in a communication sent to lawmakers, according to multiple sources. That’s something that opponents could see as a sign of disapproval and supporters were able to see as acquiescence. Goodlatte ultimately voted against adding the language from the Senate but in favor of the overall bill.

Yes, but: The bill is backed by some larger companies in tech. Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said in a post this week that the company supports "efforts to pass amended legislation in the House that would allow responsible companies to continue fighting sex trafficking while giving victims the chance to seek justice against companies that knowingly facilitate such abhorrent acts." IBM also sent a letter backing the legislation to House leaders.

  • The trade group Internet Association, which represents Google, Facebook and others, supported both the House and Senate language separately but did not outright endorse the combined measure that passed on Tuesday.

What’s next?: Supporters of the legislation hope it will get a vote in the Senate in the next four to six weeks, an aide said, at which point it would head to President Trump.

  • "This bipartisan piece of legislation provides important tools for Federal prosecutors and State officials to fight the scourge of sex trafficking," White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement. "The Administration remains concerned about certain provisions in the bill, as expressed in the Department of Justice’s technical assistance, and hopes that these issues can be resolved in a final bill presented to the President for signature.

Go deeper

Robert Mueller speaks out on Roger Stone commutation

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Capitol Hill on Wednesday July 24, 2019. Photo: The Washington Post / Contributor

Former special counsel Robert Mueller responded to claims from President Trump and his allies that Roger Stone was a "victim" in the Justice Department's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, writing in a Washington Post op-ed published Saturday: "He remains a convicted felon, and rightly so."

Why it matters: The rare public comments by Mueller come on the heels of President Trump's move to commute the sentence of his longtime associate, who was sentenced in February to 40 months in prison for crimes stemming from the Russia investigation. The controversial decision brought an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars.

Trump dons face mask during Walter Reed visit

Trump wearing a face mask in Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on July 11. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump wore a face mask during his Saturday visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, according to AP.

Why it matters: This is the first known occasion the president has appeared publicly with a facial covering as recommended by health officials since the coronavirus pandemic began, AP writes.

Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 12,607,510 — Total deaths: 562,338 — Total recoveries — 6,948,863Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 3,228,884 — Total deaths: 134,600 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,919,421Map.
  3. Public health: Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter: "Please wear a mask to save lives" Fauci hasn't briefed Trump on the coronavirus pandemic in at least two months — We're losing the war on the coronavirus.
  4. Food: How the coronavirus pandemic boosted alternative meat.
  5. Sports: Charge of "money grab" by college football.
  6. World: India reimposes lockdowns as coronavirus cases soar.