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Andrew Harnik / AP

Attorney General Jeff Sessions — along with Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats — held a press conference this morning to announce a Department of Justice crackdown on government leaks, especially those that threaten national security.

One big thing: Sessions said that the DOJ might begin reviewing the potential for media subpoenas, saying that the press does not have an "unlimited" role in American society. "They cannot place lives at risk with impunity. We must balance the press' role with protecting our national security and the lives of those who serve in our intelligence community, the armed forces, and all law-abiding Americans."

Other news:

  • Sessions announced the formation of a new FBI counterintelligence unit to investigate leakers.
  • By the numbers: Sessions said that there have been as many leak inquiries in the past six months as over the prior three years.

More quotes from the presser:

  • Sessions' message to the country: "We will not allow rogue anonymous sources with security clearances to sell out our country…Cases will be made and leakers will be held accountable."
  • Sessions on leaks of Trump's transcripts yesterday: "No government can be effective when its leaders cannot discuss sensitive matters in confidence or talk freely in confidence with foreign leaders."
  • Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats to leakers: "To anyone out there listening...we will find you...we will prosecute you to the fullest extent of the law, and you will not be happy with the result."

Notable: Sessions and Coats — along with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who was also present — left without taking questions from the assembled press corps.

Go deeper

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.

Bush labels Clyburn the “savior” for Democrats

House Majority Whip James Clyburn takes a selfie Wednesday with former President George W. Bush. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush credited Rep. James Clyburn with being the "savior" of the Democratic Party, telling the South Carolinian at Wednesday's inauguration his endorsement allowed Joe Biden to win the party's presidential nomination.

Why it matters: The nation's last two-term Republican president also said Clyburn's nod allowed for the transfer of power, because he felt only Biden had the ability to unseat President Trump.