Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Photo: Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions told White House counsel Don McGahn last weekend that if Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein was fired, he "would have to consider leaving," according to the Washington Post. Axios has not yet confirmed the story.

Why it matters: Rosenstein has come under fire in recent weeks by conservative groups, and there has been speculation that he would be the next to get the boot from Trump. As Axios' Jonathan Swan reported, the problem with Rosenstein is, "[t]hey don't have a clean way to get rid of him."

Per the Post, Sessions following Rosenstein out the door "underscores the political firestorm that Trump would invite" by following through with firing him.

  • A person familiar with the call between Sessions and McGahn told the Post that "Sessions did not intend to threaten the White House but rather wanted to convey the untenable position that Rosenstein's firing would put him in."

Go deeper

Updated 28 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. EST: 32,356,829 — Total deaths: 984,813 — Total recoveries: 22,278,696Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m EST: 6,997,468 — Total deaths: 203,147 — Total recoveries: 2,710,183 — Total tests: 98,481,026Map.
  3. States: "We’re not closing anything going forward": Florida fully lifts COVID restaurant restrictions — Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam tests positive for coronavirus.
  4. Health: Young people accounted for 20% of cases this summer.
  5. Business: Coronavirus has made airports happier places The expiration of Pandemic Unemployment Assistance looms.
  6. Education: Where bringing students back to school is most risky.

Florida fully lifts coronavirus restrictions on restaurants

Photo: Don Juan Moore/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) announced Friday the state will completely reopen its economy, allowing restaurants to operate at full capacity and barring localities from ordering businesses to close.

Why it matters: The state became one of the world's epicenters for the virus in July, forcing DeSantis to pause its first round of reopening.

3 hours ago - Economy & Business

Eyeing the end of gas-powered cars

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Gasoline-powered cars may be going the way of the woolly mammoth, even if it will take decades to replace them and seems hard to fathom today.

The big picture: Internal combustion engines (ICEs) have powered automobiles for more than 100 years. But the shift to electric vehicles, slow to materialize at first, is now accelerating due to tightening government policies, falling costs and a societal reckoning about climate change.

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