Trump with Sens. Cotton and Perdue at the White House. Photo: Zach Gibson, Pool / Getty Images

As the Senate voted on a continuing resolution to keep the government open until Feb. 8, senators from both sides of the aisle visited the White House to continue negotiating an immigration deal with Trump.

Why it matters: We could well be heading for another shutdown if no agreement on immigration is reached by Feb. 8.

The Republicans, per the White House:

  • Sen. Tom Cotton
  • Sen. John Cornyn
  • Sen. Chuck Grassley
  • Sen. James Lankford
  • Sen. David Perdue
  • Sen. Thom Tillis

The Democrats, per AP's Zeke Miller:

  • Sen. Joe Manchin
  • Sen. Doug Jones

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Trump dons face mask during Walter Reed visit

Trump wearing a face mask in Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on July 11. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump wore a face mask during his Saturday visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, according to AP.

Why it matters: This is the first known occasion the president has appeared publicly with a facial covering as recommended by health officials since the coronavirus pandemic began, AP writes.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 12,607,510 — Total deaths: 562,338 — Total recoveries — 6,948,863Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 3,228,884 — Total deaths: 134,600 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,919,421Map.
  3. Public health: Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter: "Please wear a mask to save lives" Fauci hasn't briefed Trump on the coronavirus pandemic in at least two months — We're losing the war on the coronavirus.
  4. Food: How the coronavirus pandemic boosted alternative meat.
  5. Sports: Charge of "money grab" by college football.
  6. World: India reimposes lockdowns as coronavirus cases soar.

Supreme Court expands religious freedoms in schools, employment

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Supreme Court ended its term with a series of rulings on religion's role in schools, the workplace and access to health care.

Why it matters: The decisions elevated protections for people and employers of faith, while curtailing those of religion teachers, the nonreligious taxpayer and women who rely on their workplaces' health care plans for contraception.