Oct 19, 2017

Senate Republicans try to flip Trump on Alexander-Murray

Erica Pandey, author of @Work

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn speaks with Sen. Lindsey Graham at a hearing. Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

Senate Republicans are urging the president to back the bipartisan Alexander-Murray deal to stabilize insurance markets, Politico reports. The White House said Wednesday that Trump does not support the bill in its current form.

What they're saying:

  • Sen. Lindsey Graham told Trump, "You can't save Obamacare but you can keep the markets from collapsing until we get a replacement, which will be Graham-Cassidy ... I just don't see a transition to Obamacare to a block grant that doesn't require at least a couple years to implement." Trump has said his ultimate goal for health care reform will involve block grants to the states, like the Graham-Cassidy plan.
  • Sen. Lamar Alexander said he's spoken to the president four times in the last 10 days about his bill.
  • Sen. John Cornyn said, "I don't think there's any chance of passing it without the president's support."
  • Sen. John McCain said, "If there's a package that's supported by the majority of the American people and the Congress, then we will pass it," signaling he thinks the president's opposition shouldn't matter.

Go deeper

18 mins ago - World

The president vs. the Pentagon

Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.

New York Times says Tom Cotton op-ed did not meet standards

Photo: Avalon/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

A New York Times spokesperson said in a statement Thursday that the paper will be changing its editorial board processes after a Wednesday op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), which called for President Trump to "send in the troops" in order to quell violent protests, failed to meet its standards.

Why it matters: The shift comes after Times employees began a coordinated movement on social media on Wednesday and Thursday that argued that publishing the op-ed put black staff in danger. Cotton wrote that Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act in order to deploy the U.S. military against rioters that have overwhelmed police forces in cities across the country.

George Floyd updates

Thousands of protesters march over the Brooklyn Bridge on June 4 in New York City. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

All four former Minneapolis police officers have been charged for George Floyd’s death and are in custody, including Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao, who were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

The latest: Civil rights groups filed a lawsuit Thursday against President Trump, Attorney General Bill Barr and other federal officials on behalf of Black Lives Matter and other peaceful protesters who were forcibly removed with rubber bullets and chemical irritants before Trump's photo-op at the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church on Monday.