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Alex Brandon / AP

Senate Democrats were noncommittal today when asked if the removal of ACA insurer subsidies was a deal-breaker for any spending bill ahead of this weekend's possible government shutdown. One common refrain on the Hill today: it's an executive branch issue — and it's up to the Trump administration to fund the subsidies.

Between the lines: The comments suggest that House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi isn't getting a lot of support from her Senate colleagues as she tries to push the Trump administration to include the subsidies. Senate Democrats aren't voicing a willingness to trigger a shutdown over insurer subsidies. Their play right now looks to be to make it Trump's problem while avoiding getting the blood of a shutdown on their hands.

A view across the Senate Democratic spectrum — from leadership to moderate to liberal:

  • Minority Whip Dick Durbin: "It's a disappointment because it puts in jeopardy health insurance for 7 million Americans."
  • Sen. Patty Murray, member of leadership: "[Trump] can do it from an administrative point of view as they always have — not fight it in the courts — and continue the stability of the markets."
  • Sen. Claire McCaskill: "First of all, this is a responsibility of the executive branch. It's mandatory spending. I don't know why this has been turned into an appropriation problem."
  • Sen. Chris Murphy: "I don't buy the idea that the only way this gets done is if it's in the budget. The president ultimately has the power to allocate this money and I don't think Trump is going to take the blame for 7 million people losing their insurance because he refuses to allocate the money."

Go deeper

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

14 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.