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Testing a driverless semi-truck. Photo: TuSimple

Heavy truck manufacturer Navistar announced a strategic partnership with TuSimple, a leader in self-driving technology, to co-develop a line of autonomous semi-trucks that would be on the road by 2024.

Why it matters: It's a giant milestone toward deployment of TuSimple's driverless technology and would shave up to five years off the industry timeline for autonomous semis, writes FreightWaves, a trucking publication.

What's happening: TuSimple, which plans to demonstrate its fully driverless technology in 2021, says self-driving semis will enhance safety, increase efficiency and reduce operating costs.

  • The two companies have been working together for two years, including pilot runs between Arizona and Texas.

What to watch: Navistar, maker of International brand trucks, took an undisclosed minority interest in TuSimple, and could increase its stake over time.

Go deeper

Oct 23, 2020 - Economy & Business

We're all guinea pigs for Tesla's latest self-driving tech

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Tesla is beta-testing its latest self-driving technology with a small group of early adopters, a move that alarms experts and makes every road user — including other motorists, pedestrians and cyclists — unwitting subjects in its ongoing safety experiment.

Why it matters: Tesla hailed the limited rollout of its "full self-driving" beta software as a key milestone, but the warnings on the car's touchscreen underscore the risk in using its own customers — rather than trained safety drivers — to validate the technology.

GOP implosion: Trump threats, payback

Spotted last week on a work van in Evansville, Ind. Photo: Sam Owens/The Evansville Courier & Press via Reuters

The GOP is getting torn apart by a spreading revolt against party leaders for failing to stand up for former President Trump and punish his critics.

Why it matters: Republican leaders suffered a nightmarish two months in Washington. Outside the nation’s capital, it's even worse.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

The limits of Biden's plan to cancel student debt

Data: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax; Chart: Axios Visuals

There’s a growing consensus among Americans who want President Biden to cancel student debt — but addressing the ballooning debt burden is much more complicated than it seems.

Why it matters: Student debt is stopping millions of Americans from buying homes, buying cars and starting families. And the crisis is rapidly getting worse.