A student and adult embrace outside Noblesville West Middle School after a shooting in May. Photo: Kevin Moloney/Getty Images

The U.S. Secret Service has revised its guidelines for preventing school violence in the wake of February's Stoneman Douglas High School shooting that killed 17.

The big picture: The Secret Service said in its press release that the guidelines aim to provide "schools and communities with a framework to identify students of concern, assess their risk for engaging in violence, and identify intervention strategies to mitigate that risk."

The details: The new guidelines recommend that a school team composed of teachers, guidance counselors, mental health professionals, coaches and principals "meet on a regular basis to engage in discussions, role-playing scenarios, and other team building and learning scenarios.

  • The guide encourages school climates where students "feel empowered to share concerns with adults, without feeling ashamed or facing the stigma of being labeled a "snitch."
  • It discourages the notion that student attackers have a profile: "There have been male and female attackers, high-achieving students with good grades, as well as poor performers. These acts of violence were committed by students who were loners and socially isolated, and those who were well-liked and popular."
  • It encourages students to anonymously report "troubling behavior" through email, online forums, and more.
"The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting tragedy served as the impetus to go beyond our past work and go in depth regarding the how - how do we solve this epidemic?"
Secret Service Director R.D. "Tex" Alles

Go deeper

"Not enough": Protesters react to no murder charges in Breonna Taylor case

A grand jury on Wednesday indicted Brett Hankison, one of the Louisville police officers who entered Breonna Taylor's home in March, on three counts of wanton endangerment for firing shots blindly into neighboring apartments.

Details: Angering protesters, the grand jury did not indict any of the three officers involved in the botched drug raid on homicide or manslaughter charges related to the death of Taylor.

Two officers shot in Louisville amid Breonna Taylor protests

Police officers stand guard during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Ben Hendren/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Louisville Metro Police Department said two officers were shot downtown in the Kentucky city late Wednesday, just hours after a grand jury announced an indictment in the Breonna Taylor case.

Details: A police spokesperson told a press briefing a suspect was in custody and that the injuries of both officers were not life-threatening. One officer was "alert and stable" and the other was undergoing surgery, he said.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

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