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A student and adult embrace outside Noblesville West Middle School after a shooting in May. Photo: Kevin Moloney/Getty Images

The U.S. Secret Service has revised its guidelines for preventing school violence in the wake of February's Stoneman Douglas High School shooting that killed 17.

The big picture: The Secret Service said in its press release that the guidelines aim to provide "schools and communities with a framework to identify students of concern, assess their risk for engaging in violence, and identify intervention strategies to mitigate that risk."

The details: The new guidelines recommend that a school team composed of teachers, guidance counselors, mental health professionals, coaches and principals "meet on a regular basis to engage in discussions, role-playing scenarios, and other team building and learning scenarios.

  • The guide encourages school climates where students "feel empowered to share concerns with adults, without feeling ashamed or facing the stigma of being labeled a "snitch."
  • It discourages the notion that student attackers have a profile: "There have been male and female attackers, high-achieving students with good grades, as well as poor performers. These acts of violence were committed by students who were loners and socially isolated, and those who were well-liked and popular."
  • It encourages students to anonymously report "troubling behavior" through email, online forums, and more.
"The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting tragedy served as the impetus to go beyond our past work and go in depth regarding the how - how do we solve this epidemic?"
Secret Service Director R.D. "Tex" Alles

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Why it matters: The Fed-driven economy relies on the creation of trillions of dollars — literally out of thin air — that are used to purchase bonds and push money into a pandemic-ravaged economy that has long been dependent on free cash and is only growing more addicted.

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Attorney General Barr may be fired or resign, as President Trump seethes about Barr's statement this week that no widespread voter fraud has been found.

Behind the scenes: A source familiar with the president's thinking tells Axios that Trump remains frustrated with what he sees as the lack of a vigorous investigation into his election conspiracy theories.

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - World

Scoop: Trump's spy chief plans dire China warning

Xi Jinping reviews troops during a military parade in Beijing last year. Photo: Thomas Peter/Reuters

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe on Thursday will publicly warn that China's threat to the U.S. is a defining issue of our time, a senior administration official tells Axios.

Why it matters: It's exceedingly rare for the head of the U.S. intelligence community to make public accusations about a rival power.

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