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RXR Realty CEO Scott Rechler. Photo: Eugene Gologursky/Getty Images for National Eating Disorder Association/Getty Images

Businesses will have to "recalibrate reality" as they move forward during the coronavirus pandemic, Scott Rechler, the chairman and CEO of commercial realtor RXR Realty, said during an Axios event.

What he's saying: Rechler said the buildings his company manages will use data to establish health indexes, use thermal scanners and have a wellness concierge in place in building lobbies to ensure that workers feel comfortable returning.

  • Rechler said the process will start at home "where people have an app, and when they get up in the morning before they come to work, they'll be able to actually look at the health index" and decide if they should come to work or stay at home.
  • Touchless technology will be available on elevators.
  • "We're thinking about rotating people back into the office ... at 25%. So there's a rotation. There's also going to be staggering of the times that people come in and do work," he added.
"It's not going to be business as usual, nor should it be business as usual. Because on the other side of this, we're going to be coming back to not the new normal, but what I like to call the new abnormal, which is finding a way of how we are going to co-exist while the virus is still out there."

Go deeper

Google to keep workers at home through July 2021

Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Photo: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Google will keep its employees out of its offices and working from home through at least next July, the tech giant confirmed on Monday.

Why it matters: It's the first major U.S. company to allow remote work for such an extended period in response to the coronavirus pandemic. The Wall Street Journal first reported on the extension.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
25 mins ago - Podcasts

Bill Browder on Russia-U.S. relations after Alexei Navalny's arrest

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was recently arrested in Moscow, just months after being poisoned in an assassination attempt, in what could become Joe Biden’s first major foreign policy test.

Axios Re:Cap speaks with Bill Browder, an investor and author who has his own history of clashing with Putin, to better understand the Navalny situation and how the U.S. might respond by using a law that Browder helped create.

3 hours ago - World

Special report: Trump's U.S.-China transformation

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump began his term by launching the trade war with China he had promised on the campaign trail. By mid-2020, however, Trump was no longer the public face of China policy-making as he became increasingly consumed with domestic troubles, giving his top aides carte blanche to pursue a cascade of tough-on-China policies.

Why it matters: Trump alone did not reshape the China relationship. But his trade war shattered global norms, paving the way for administration officials to pursue policies that just a few years earlier would have been unthinkable.