Scott Gottlieb (left)(AP Photo/Harry Hamburg, File)

President Trump recently nominated Scott Gottlieb, a venture partner with New Enterprise Associates, to lead the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This isn't terribly surprising, as we had previously noted that Gottlieb was the front-runner in a process that also included a pair of other folks with venture capital credentials (Jim O'Neill of Peter Thiel's Mithril and former Andreessen Horowitz partner Balaji Srinivasan).

Axios spoke with with David Mott, the former MedImmune CEO who now leads NEA's healthcare investing practice, for some thoughts on Gottlieb:

Selling point: Mott argues that Gottlieb was the best person for the job because he has a "360 degree" view of the healthcare system, given that he is a practicing physcian, has worked with healthcare entrepreneurs and investors via NEA, has been a paid consultant to big pharma, has worked in a medical academic institution, has past FDA (and CMS) experience and is a cancer survivor. In short, he understands the pressures each group is under.

On conflicts: "Yes, he's been paid by drug companies and been on startup boards in the past, but he won't be going forward... He will help set direction, but he's not going to be the person overseeing a review, say, of an NEA portfolio company's product." Mott adds that Gottlieb does not have carried interest in NEA funds, and that there already have been discussions of how to manage/sever any other economic ties to NEA (although he declined to provide details).

In general: Mott agrees with many other healthcare VCs that the FDA approval process for both medical devices and pharma has improved substantially over the past several years, and he expects Gottlieb to keep moving such improvements forward. He also is pleased that the GOP healthcare plan (which he has not yet studied in detail) eliminates the so-called "medical device tax," which he believes had a "destructive impact on people's confidence in dedicating time, capital and resources to medical devices."

Go deeper

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 12,009,301 — Total deaths: 548,799 — Total recoveries — 6,561,969Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 3,053,328 — Total deaths: 132,256 — Total recoveries: 953,420 — Total tested: 37,532,612Map.
  3. Public health: Houston mayor cancels Republican convention over coronavirus concerns Deaths are rising in hotspots — Déjà vu sets in as testing issues rise and PPE dwindles.
  4. Travel: United warns employees it may furlough 45% of U.S. workforce How the pandemic changed mobility habits, by state.
  5. Education: New York City schools will not fully reopen in fallHarvard and MIT sue Trump administration over rule barring foreign students from online classes.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: A misinformation "infodemic" is here.

Transcripts show George Floyd told police "I can't breathe" over 20 times

Photo: Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Newly released transcripts of bodycam footage from the Minneapolis Police Department show that George Floyd told officers he could not breathe more than 20 times in the moments leading up to his death.

Why it matters: Floyd's killing sparked a national wave of Black Lives Matter protests and an ongoing reckoning over systemic racism in the United States. The transcripts "offer one the most thorough and dramatic accounts" before Floyd's death, The New York Times writes.

9 hours ago - Health

Fighting the coronavirus infodemic

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

An "infodemic" of misinformation and disinformation has helped cripple the response to the novel coronavirus.

Why it matters: High-powered social media accelerates the spread of lies and political polarization that motivates people to believe them. Unless the public health sphere can effectively counter misinformation, not even an effective vaccine may be enough to end the pandemic.