A radiologist checks mammograms for signs of breast cancer. Photo: Damian Dovarganes / AP

Scientists have found over 70 genetic variants that are linked to a patient's risk of developing breast cancer, The Scientist reports. The variants are enumerated in two new studies in Nature and Nature Genetics.

Why it matters: The discoveries could help predict whether or not women are at risk for breast cancer based on their genetics. Researchers could also use the findings to "identify genes and pathways and biological mechanisms that allow us to understand how breast cancers arise," Timothy Rebbeck, an epidemiologist at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, told The Scientist.

Worth noting: The newly identified variants are found in large swaths of the population but the risk for breast cancer associated with having just one of the mutations is small compared to that related to mutations in high-risk genes like BCRA1 and BCRA2, Roger Milne, a cancer epidemiologist involved with both studies, told The Scientist.

Go deeper

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine again tests negative for coronavirus after positive result

Photo: Justin Merriman/Getty Images

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) tested negative for COVID-19 for a second time after initially testing positive last week, he announced Saturday.

Why it matters: 73-year-old DeWine was set to meet President Trump Thursday on the tarmac at an airport in Cleveland and was tested as part of standard protocol.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1 a.m. ET: 19,571,989 — Total deaths: 726,781 — Total recoveries — 11,939,109Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1 a.m. ET: 4,997,929 — Total deaths: 162,423 — Total recoveries: 1,643,118 — Total tests: 61,080,587Map.
  3. Politics: Trump signs 4 executive actions on coronavirus aid — Democrats, and some Republicans, criticize the move
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective — 1 in 3 Americans would decline COVID-19 vaccine.
  5. Science: Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline.
  6. Schools: How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on — Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Howard to hold fall classes online.
Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Republicans and Democrats react to Trump's coronavirus aid action

President Trump speaks to workers at a manufacturing facility in Clyde, Ohio, on Thursday. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Some Republicans joined Democrats in criticizing President Trump Saturday night for taking executive action on coronavirus aid, with Democratic leaders demanding the GOP return to negotiations after stimulus package talks broke down a day earlier.

Why it matters: Trump could face legal challenges on his ability to act without congressional approval, where the power lies on federal spending. Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) was the most vocal Republican critic, saying in a statement: "The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop."