Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Second Amendment activists and some security experts are calling for safer school designs, while some gun-control advocates say it's a distracting issue that avoids more meaningful action, AP's Lisa Marie Pane reports.

What kicked things off: Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (R) said after Friday's shooting: "There are too many entrances and too many exits to our over 8,000 campuses in Texas."

The case for "hardening" schools:

  • "After the 9/11 terror attacks, the United States took steps to secure government and public buildings — from airports to concert halls."
  • "According to a report last year in Education Week, a trade publication, the average age of an American school is 44 years with major renovations dating back more than a decade. Older buildings were designed without today's worries of active shooters and terrorism."
  • "They have lots of 'nooks and crannies,' isolated areas that are difficult to supervise, as well as old hardware on classroom doors and main offices that aren't located near the main entrance."
  • "Other problems include old public-address systems and no telephones in classrooms."

The case against:

  • "[E]ducational considerations create some natural tension with security needs. Studying in places with lots of light ... is thought to improve learning."
  • "Having metal detectors at the entrance creates long lines, which means schools have to start earlier and hire more staff to screen students."

P.S. Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo makes an emotional gun-control push on Facebook (Houston is 36 miles from Santa Fe):

  • "I know some have strong feelings about gun rights but I want you to know I’ve hit rock bottom and I am not interested in your views as it pertains to this issue. Please do not post anything about guns aren’t the problem and there’s little we can do. My feelings won’t be hurt if you de-friend me and I hope yours won’t be if you decide to post about your views and I de-friend you."

Go deeper

In photos: Virginians line up for hours on first day of early voting

Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

In some parts of Virginia, people waited in line up to four hours to cast their ballots on the first day of early voting, according to the Washington Post.

The big picture: The COVID-19 pandemic seems to already have an impact on how people cast their votes this election season. As many as 80 million Americans are expected to vote early, by mail or in person, Tom Bonier, CEO of TargetSmart, a Democratic political data firm, told Axios in August.

Updated 58 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 30,306,469 — Total deaths: 948,147— Total recoveries: 20,626,515Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 6,705,114 — Total deaths: 198,197 — Total recoveries: 2,540,334 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.

Court battles shift mail-in voting deadlines in battleground states

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Michigan joins Pennsylvania in extending mail-in ballot deadlines by several days after the election, due to the coronavirus pandemic and expected delays in U.S. Postal Service.

The latest: Michigan Court of Claims Judge Cynthia Stephens ruled that all ballots postmarked before Nov. 2 must be counted, so long as they arrive in the mail before election results are certified. Michigan will certify its general election results on Nov. 23.