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Expand chart
Data: MoffettNathanson; Chart: Axios Visuals

Of all the major TV blackouts happening this year, many of the biggest conflicts are occurring between the two big satellite companies and TV networks.

Why it matters: The Pay-TV business is in terminal decline, and in some ways, satellite operators are feeing the losses more than their cable counterparts, who are able to lean more heavily on broadband sales to recoup the losses.

Be smart: Sports has become a flashpoint point for blackout disputes, as Pay-TV operators argue that the value of live sports is decreasing with viewership declines. TV networks are increasingly trying to bundle their sports channels into their Pay-TV package offerings.

Diving the news: NBC Sports Chicago went dark for Dish TV and Sling TV subscribers last night. The network warned it could go dark for AT&T customers, but it seems as though the two entities are in negotiation.

  • CBS stations went dark on DirecTV and AT&T Now this summer for three weeks during the start of the NFL pre-season.
  • Fox stations went dark on DISH and Sling TV customers in 17 markets across 23 states and DC, impacting millions of sports fans who will no longer be able to access networks like FS1, FS2, Big 10 Network, Fox Soccer Plus and Fox Deportes.

Go deeper: 2019 sees record number of TV blackouts

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
28 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Higher education expands its climate push

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

New or expanded climate initiatives are popping up at several universities, a sign of the topic's rising prominence and recognition of the threats and opportunities it creates.

Why it matters: Climate and clean energy initiatives at colleges and universities are nothing new, but it shows expanded an campus focus as the effects of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent, and the world is nowhere near the steep emissions cuts that scientists say are needed to hold future warming in check.

Ina Fried, author of Login
54 mins ago - Economy & Business

The pandemic isn't slowing tech

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Thursday's deluge of Big Tech earnings reports showed one thing pretty clearly: COVID-19 may be bad in all sorts of ways, but it's not slowing down the largest tech companies. If anything, it's helping some companies, like Amazon and Apple.

Yes, but: With the pandemic once again worsening in the U.S. and Europe, it's not clear how long the tech industry's winning streak can last.

Texas early voting surpasses 2016's total turnout

Early voting in Austin earlier this month. Photo: Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Texas' early and mail-in voting totals for the 2020 election have surpassed the state's total voter turnout in 2016, with 9,009,850 ballots already cast compared to 8,969,226 in the last presidential cycle.

Why it matters: The state's 38 Electoral College votes are in play — and could deliver a knockout blow for Joe Biden over President Trump — despite the fact that it hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976.