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Image: Samsung

Samsung will hold a Jan. 14 event to unveil a new crop of mobile devices, where it's expected to launch the Galaxy S21, thought to be the name for its next set of flagship smartphones.

Driving the news: Samsung's phone launches have been creeping earlier and earlier in recent years, erasing the opportunity for rivals to get a leg up by announcing competing phones at CES.

Samsung announced the event in a blog post and teaser video on Sunday. But you don't have to wait until then to get a good sense of what Samsung has planned, thanks to a combination of statements from the company and the usual surfeit of rumors and leaks.

  • In a blog post late last year, the company offered hints on what to expect from this year's flagship, including the ability to use ultra-wideband technology to open car doors and find lost items. Apple has already announced a similar car-unlocking feature and has been rumored to be readying dedicated devices for object tracking à la Tile.
  • Rumors and leaks have taken things further, offering still images, detailed specifications and even videos of what the new devices should look like.

The bottom line: Expect at least three capable smartphones covering the higher end of the market along with a range of new accessories.

What to watch: Whether anything Samsung has in store can make people shift from "that's nice" to "I need to own this."

Go deeper

Updated Jan 12, 2021 - Technology

What's happened so far at CES 2021

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Having moved entirely online, this year's CES is unlike any other. However, there's still a ton of tech news to watch out for, and Axios has you covered with all the big news in one place.

The big picture: We are in the midst of both a pandemic and political upheaval, but that isn't stopping the biggest tech companies in the world from sharing their latest consumer gear. Here's the latest — check back all week for more from the Axios tech team.

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.

58 mins ago - Politics & Policy
Scoop

White House plots "full-court press" for $1.9 trillion relief plan

National Economic Council Director Brian Deese speaks during a White House news briefing. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Biden White House is deploying top officials to get a wide ideological spectrum of lawmakers, governors and mayors on board with the president’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: The broad, choreographed effort shows just how crucially Biden views the stimulus to the nation's recovery and his own political success.