May 2, 2017

Salesman Trump picks up the phone, seeking reassurance

Andrew Harnik / AP

During a recent phone conversation about the evolving health-reform bill, President Trump asked a simplistic but apparently sincere question: "Is what we are going to do going to take care of people?"

What I told people is: We'll take care of people.

No deep dive on the detail. But Trump, the salesman, wanted reassurance selling a big, complicated product he doesn't fully understand.

The House Republican on the other end of the line told the president that the bill would, indeed, look after people so long as it kept in certain provisions, like allowing states with expanded Medicaid coverage to keep adding people until at least the end of 2019. Trump was very receptive to that advice, the lawmaker tells Axios' Super Swan.

Why it matters: The conversation captures the insane level of interest in not screwing up a second rushed attempt to get a health-care win for Trump.

Chief of Staff Reince Priebus rings constantly and late into the night. Vice President Pence calls from Air Force Two. The president phones when you're hanging with family on the weekend, and you have to explain when you return that it was the president calling.

While Steve Bannon is famous for his gruff, 90-second phone calls, Trump's calls can run five minutes or longer, which lawmakers say is actually quite a long time compared to the distracted approach they had expected.

Get smart fast: "The health care bill's path forward in the Senate," by Axios' Caitlin Owens: Senate Republicans are already thinking about what it will take to get the bill through the upper chamber if it, indeed, arrives from the House. The changes aren't as vast as you might think.

  • The wild card: Rand Paul. But Republicans can afford to lose two votes, so even if Paul and Susan Collins oppose the bill, it still passes.
  • The bottom line: The bill is far from dead on arrival.

Go deeper

Cuomo: Data suggests coronavirus curve may be flattening in New York

The total number of new hospitalizations, ICU admissions and daily intubations in New York have decreased each of the past three days — an indication that social distancing may be working, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday.

The big picture: The governor's office has been tracking different models that predicted a peak of between 55,000 and 110,000 hospital beds needed for coronavirus patients in New York by the end of April. Data over the past few weeks suggests that hospitalizations may potentially be plateauing earlier than those models projected.

Go deeperArrow15 mins ago - Health

Acting Navy head called fired aircraft carrier captain "stupid" in address to crew

Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly told the crew of the USS Theodore Roosevelt Monday that its ousted commander, Capt. Brett Crozier, was "too naive or too stupid" to not realize that his letter pleading for help in battling a coronavirus outbreak onboard would be leaked to the press, according to a copy of his remarks obtained by CNN.

The big picture: Modly also floated the possibility that Crozier, who has since been diagnosed with coronavirus himself, leaked the letter deliberately. He called the act a "betrayal of trust, with me, with his chain of command."

Serological coronavirus testing could be key to economic reopening

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

America's economy won't reopen anytime soon, despite frantic CEO whispers, but a glimmer of hope may be emerging in the form of serological testing.

Why it matters: Serologic tests aren't to determine whether or not you're infected with coronavirus. They are to determine if you have potential immunity that could allow you to safely return to work.