A bipartisan group of female lawmakers line the steps of the Capitol as Ginsburg's casket is carried to a hearse. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

The late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg laid in state at the Capitol on Friday, the first woman and the first Jewish person to receive such an honor.

Driving the news: After a ceremony in National Statuary Hall, Ginsburg's casket was carried down the building's steps — flanked by a group of bipartisan female lawmakers for a final farewell.

Ginsburg's casket arrives at the foot of the Capitol building's stairs. Photo: Alex Brandon/Pool/Getty Images
Ginsburg's casket is escorted up the Capitol steps by a military honor guard. Photo: Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images
Capitol Hill staffers gather in National Statuary Hall to pay their respects. Photo: Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images
Her casket was draped with a U.S. flag. Photo: Erin Schaff/Pool/Getty Images
Joe and Jill Biden attended the service. Photo: Erin Schaff/Pool/Getty Images
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) pay their respects. Photo: Erin Schaff/Pool/Getty Images

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In photos: Florida breaks record for in-person early voting

Voters wait in line at John F. Kennedy Public Library in Hialeah, Florida on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Floridians cast early ballots for the 2020 election on Monday than in the first day of in-person early voting in 2016, shattering the previous record by over 50,000 votes, Politico reports.

The big picture: Voters have already cast over 31 million ballots in early voting states as of Tuesday, per the U.S. Elections Project database by Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida.

Amy Harder, author of Generate
5 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.

Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes. A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.