May 1, 2018

Robert Mueller's questions for Trump

Robert Mueller. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Special counsel Robert Mueller provided President Trump’s lawyers with a list of dozens of questions on various issues he wants to ask Trump if given the opportunity to interview him as part of his Russia investigation, and The New York Times reportedly obtained that list.

Why it matters: The questions, which reveal that Mueller is interested in learning more about Trump's ties with Russia, his relationship with his advisers and family, and the motivation behind some of his controversial tweets, offer one of the closest looks yet into Mueller's thinking. They also show that the investigation has expanded beyond Russian meddling and potential obstruction of justice to include the president’s conduct in office.

The Times categorized the questions into four key areas:

  1. Questions related to Trump's former national security adviser Mike Flynn, and whether Trump tried to obstruct justice in an effort to protect him.
  2. Questions related to former FBI Director James Comey, and whether Trump fired Comey in order to protect people close to him, like Flynn or others who could potentially face trouble surrounding Russian collusion.
  3. Questions related to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, and the president's anger after Sessions recused himself from the Russia investigation. These questions center on whether Trump "views law enforcement officials as protectors," per the Times.
  4. Questions about collusion with Russia during the campaign. Several of these questions focus on a June 2016 Trump Tower meeting between Trump officials, such as Donald Trump Jr. and Jared Kushner, and a Russian lawyer who they believed to have dirt on Hillary Clinton.

Read the NYT's full list of questions here.

Go deeper

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 684,652 — Total deaths: 32,113 — Total recoveries: 145,696.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in cases. Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 125,313 — Total deaths: 2,191 — Total recoveries: 2,612.
  3. Federal government latest: Trump announces new travel advisories for New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, but rules out quarantine enforcement.
  4. Public health updates: Fauci says 100,000 to 200,000 Americans could die from virus.
  5. State updates: Louisiana governor says state is on track to exceed ventilator capacity by end of this week.
  6. World updates: In Spain, over 1,400 people were confirmed dead between Thursday to Saturday.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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Fixing America's broken coronavirus supply chain

Polowczyk speaks at a coronavirus at the White House March 23. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The senior Navy officer now in charge of fixing America's coronavirus supply chain is trying to fill the most urgent needs: ventilators and personal protective gear. But barely a week into his role at the Federal Emergency Management Agency, he's still trying to establish what's in the pipeline and where it is.

Driving the news: "Today, I, as leader of FEMA's supply chain task force, am blind to where all the product is," Rear Admiral John Polowczyk tells Axios.

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Louisiana on track to exceed ventilator capacity this week, governor says

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said on CBS News' "Face the Nation" on Sunday that his state is at risk of exceeding its ventilator capacity by April 4, stating that he has placed orders for "about 12,000 ventilators" but has thus far only received 192.

Why it matters: Louisiana — and particularly New Orleans — is site of one of most intense coronavirus outbreaks in the U.S. Local and state government officials like Edwards have been sounding the alarm about the nationwide shortage of ventilators, which are crucial for treating patients who are unable to breathe for themselves.

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