Rudy Giuliani, former New York City mayor and current lawyer for U.S. President Donald Trump. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Trump's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, told the Daily News on Friday that after special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation concludes, those involved in the case may walk away with presidential pardons.

“When the whole thing is over, things might get cleaned up with some presidential pardons”
— Giuliani to the Daily News

Why it matters: The comment came just hours after Paul Manafort was sent to jail after his bail was revoked following an attempt to tamper with two witnesses in the Russia investigation.

"I don’t understand the justification for putting him in jail. You put a guy in jail if he’s trying to kill witnesses, not just talking to witnesses," he told the Daily News.

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Rep. Rashida Tlaib fends off Democratic primary challenge in Michigan

Rep. Rashida Tlaib. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Michigan Rep. Rashida Tlaib won her Democratic primary against challenger Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones, according to AP.

Why it matters: Tlaib, a democratic socialist and member of "The Squad," found herself in a vulnerable position, facing off against Jones after narrowly beating her two years ago.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 18,570,858 — Total deaths: 701,316 — Total recoveries — 11,163,388Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 4,771,846 — Total deaths: 156,839 — Total recoveries: 1,528,979 — Total tests: 58,239,438Map.
  3. Public health: Moderna skirts disclosures of coronavirus vaccine costs — There’s not much good news about kids and coronavirus.
  4. Business: Auto sales may have turned a corner.
  5. Sports: The return of high school sports hangs in the balance — UConn becomes first FBS team to cancel its football season.

Shale's struggles will persist despite a rise in oil prices

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

WTI, the benchmark U.S. oil future, traded Wednesday morning at its highest since early March — highlighting how shale's crisis is seemingly over, though more bankruptcies likely lie ahead.

Why it matters: Its price at the time — $43 — is still too low for many producers to do well, though it varies from company to company.