Photo: Owen Humphreys - WPA Pool/Getty Images

The infectiously energetic sermon of the Most Rev. Michael Curry, an American who is presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, "summed up this most modern of royal weddings: diverse, relaxed, inclusive and joyous," The Telegraph reports.

Why it matters: "The ancient St. George’s Chapel echoed with laughter at times. It swayed to the delicious harmonies of an African-American Gospel choir, it swooned over the talent of a 19-year-old cellist and sent a message to the watching world that the Royal family has, once again, been reinvented."

  • "The head of the U.S. Episcopal Church swept the concept of royal weddings into a new era by referencing Martin Luther King, slavery, war, poverty, hunger and even Instagram."
  • His theme: The “redemptive power of love” can right the world’s wrongs.
  • "With an iPad on the lectern in front of him, the Bishop waved his arms expansively, raising and lowering his voice for emphasis and ad-libbing freely throughout."

Read or watch the full sermon.

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