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Photo: Brynn Anderson / AP

Roy Moore has a record of being "sharply conservative on social issues but occasionally sympathetic to convicted criminals," according to the New York Times.

Why it matters: The Times reported that while Moore was a conservative judge, he often ruled in favor of "a convict's request for the appeal to be heard" during a case. Out of 20 cases regarding sexual crimes and misconduct, Moore "sided with the accused 13 times, a higher rate than almost all of his colleagues." Two former colleagues of Moore told the Times he feared defendants "were sometimes wronged by the system."

  • A teenager was sentenced to 23 years in prison after sexually assaulting a boy at a day care center. Moore argued that the court was "stepping into the shoes of the legislature," and that one of the two sodomy laws used to convict him wasn't applicable to his case.
  • He argued against a man's life sentence, saying "life imprisonment without the possibility of parole for a nonviolent, drug-related crime reveals grave flaws in our statutory sentencing scheme."
  • A lawyer that worked with Moore told the Times: "He had no love for criminals, but he believed that every defendant was entitled to the due process of law."

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Hospital crisis deepens as holiday season nears.
  2. Vaccine: Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorizationVaccinating rural America won't be easy — Being last in the vaccine queue is young people's next big COVID test.
  3. Politics: Bipartisan group of senators seeks stimulus dealChuck Grassley returns to Senate after recovering from COVID-19.
  4. States: Cuomo orders emergency hospital protocols as COVID capacity dwindles.
  5. Economy: Wall Street wonders how bad economy has to get for Congress to act.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: The state of play of the top vaccines.
2 hours ago - Health

First blood test to help diagnose Alzheimer's goes public

Photo: Jerry Naunheim Jr./C2N Diagnostics via AP

A non-COVID medical breakthrough: People over 60 now have access to a blood test for Alzheimer's disease.

Why it matters: The existing PET brain scan test costs some people about $5,000 and often isn't covered by insurance, AP reports.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Wisconsin, Arizona certify Biden's victories

Photo: Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Arizona and Wisconsin officials confirmed the presidential election results in their states, formalizing President-elect Joe Biden's victories in the key battlegrounds.

Why it matters: The moves deal yet another blow to President Trump's efforts to block or delay certification in key swing states that he lost.