Apr 20, 2017

Roger Stone is back

Seth Wenig / AP

The colorful, controversial Roger Stone — author of "The Making of the President 2016: How Donald Trump Orchestrated a Revolution" — is the WashPost Style section cover story, "A bedrock of dark politics," by Manuel Roig-Franzia in Oakland Park, Fla.:

  • "Stone, a prolific author who hosts a radio program and runs a website, StoneColdTruth.com, never really went away. He's been talking nonstop for decades, pointing an accusing finger at Lyndon Johnson for alleged complicity in the Kennedy assassination, rooting around in Bill Clinton's extramarital misdeeds, depicting the Bushes as a "crime family." It's just that now there are more people listening."
  • "His studio — a man-cave-style haunt slathered floor to ceiling with Nixon memorabilia and conspiracy books — has been stocked with professional lighting and a broadcast-quality audio line by Stone's 19-year-old grandson, Nick."
  • "Stone met his Cuban American wife, Nydia, during one of Ronald Reagan's presidential campaigns, where she was working as a photographer. In a Polaroid picture taped to her computer monitor, the future married couple are slender and stylish with deep 1980s tans."

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Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday night across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day — prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: The Army moved 1,600 soldiers from out of state into D.C. area, the Defense Department confirmed in a statement Tuesday. Protesters were still out en masse for mostly after curfews began in cities including Washington, D.C., New York City, Los Angeles and Portland.

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In the midst of a global pandemic and national protests over the death of George Floyd, eight states and the District of Columbia held primary elections on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, needs to win 425 of the 479 delegates up for grabs in order to officially clinch the nomination. There are a number of key down-ballot races throughout the country as well, including a primary in Iowa that could determine the fate of Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

Iowa Rep. Steve King defeated in GOP primary

Rep. Steve King. Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

State Sen. Randy Feenstra defeated incumbent Rep. Steve King in Tuesday's Republican primary for Iowa's 4th congressional district, according to the Cook Political Report.

Why it matters: King's history of racist remarks has made him one of the most controversial politicians in the country and a pariah within the Republican Party.