Jun 1, 2017

Robot trucks could replace 2 million drivers by 2030

Tony Avelar / AP

Losers, per a new report from the International Transportation Forum: Introducing automated trucks in the U.S. and Europe would reduce the need for drivers by 50% to 70% by 2030, per the report. It's estimated that 4.4 million of the current 6.4 million drivers' jobs would become unnecessary, and over 2 million drivers would be directly displaced throughout the U.S. and Europe.

Winners: These driverless trucks will reportedly make roads safer, lower emissions, and help save costs. They will also help mitigate the shortage of people who want to become professional truck drivers, the report claims.

What's next: The report outline four recommendations on how to make the transition to driverless cars easier on those who will be displaced:

  1. "Establish a transition advisory board to advise on labour issues."
  2. "Consider a temporary permit system to manage the speed of adoption."
  3. "Set international standards, road rules and vehicle regulations for self-driving trucks."
  4. "Continue pilot projects with driverless trucks to test vehicles, network technology and communications protocols."

Go deeper: Here's where jobs will be lost when robots drive trucks.

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Coronavirus kills 2 Diamond Princess passengers and South Korea sees first death

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. U.S. numbers include Americans extracted from Princess Cruise ship.

Two elderly Diamond Princess passengers have been killed by the novel coronavirus — the first deaths confirmed among the more than 600 infected aboard the cruise ship. South Korea also announced its first death Thursday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed more than 2,200 people and infected over 75,465 others, mostly in mainland China, where the National Health Commission announced 118 new deaths since Thursday.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 6 hours ago - Health

SoftBank to cut its stake to get T-Mobile's Sprint deal done

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

T-Mobile and Sprint announced a revised merger agreement that will see SoftBank getting a smaller share of the combined company, while most shareholders will receive the previously agreed upon exchange rate. The companies said they hope to get the deal as early as April 1.

Why it matters: The amended deal reflects the decline in Sprint's business, while leaving most shareholders' stake intact and removing another hurdle to the deal's closure.