Tony Avelar / AP

Losers, per a new report from the International Transportation Forum: Introducing automated trucks in the U.S. and Europe would reduce the need for drivers by 50% to 70% by 2030, per the report. It's estimated that 4.4 million of the current 6.4 million drivers' jobs would become unnecessary, and over 2 million drivers would be directly displaced throughout the U.S. and Europe.

Winners: These driverless trucks will reportedly make roads safer, lower emissions, and help save costs. They will also help mitigate the shortage of people who want to become professional truck drivers, the report claims.

What's next: The report outline four recommendations on how to make the transition to driverless cars easier on those who will be displaced:

  1. "Establish a transition advisory board to advise on labour issues."
  2. "Consider a temporary permit system to manage the speed of adoption."
  3. "Set international standards, road rules and vehicle regulations for self-driving trucks."
  4. "Continue pilot projects with driverless trucks to test vehicles, network technology and communications protocols."

Go deeper: Here's where jobs will be lost when robots drive trucks.

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Gulf Coast braces for Zeta after storm strengthens into hurricane

Hurricane Zeta's forecast path. Photo: National Hurricane Center

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency Monday as Zeta strengthened into a hurricane and threatened Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula as it moved towards the U.S. Gulf Coast.

The state of play: Zeta was expected to make landfall on the northern part of the Yucatan Peninsula Monday night, bringing with it a "dangerous storm surge" and "heavy rainfall" as it moved into the Gulf of Mexico, the National Hurricane Service said.

Updated 52 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: The swing states where the pandemic is raging — Pence no longer expected to attend Barrett confirmation vote after COVID exposure.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day case records last week
  3. Business: Where stimulus is needed most.
  4. Education: The dangerous instability of school re-openings.
  5. World: Restrictions grow across Europe.
  6. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.

Supreme Court rejects request to extend Wisconsin absentee ballot deadline

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court in a 5-3 decision Monday rejected an effort by Wisconsin Democrats and civil rights groups to extend the state's deadline for counting absentee ballots to six days after Election Day, as long as they were postmarked by Nov. 3.

Why it matters: All ballots must now be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in Wisconsin, a critical swing state in the presidential election.