Apr 23, 2017

Rise of the Trump resistance movement

From pink-hatted protesters to big town hall turnout, the anti-Trump resistance has been in full swing since January's inauguration. The left is taking a page out of the Tea Party playbook, and building the resistance from the grassroots up.

Why it matters: We saw a similar rise on the right in 2009-2010 shortly after Obama was inaugurated, and a huge number of Republican lawmakers were voted into office. That movement shook up US politics and changed the face of the Republican Party, and we could see similar aftershocks here.

Money:

Media:

  • The most engaged partisan Facebook pages belong to left-leaning and Trump resistance groups. These pages are outperforming popular news competitors in overall engagement.
  • Anti-Trump sites launched across the web -- some with prominent names behind them, such as 'Crooked Media,' by former Obama staffers and 'Resistance Calendar,' by filmmaker Michael Moore.
  • Cell phone apps and internet start ups that send daily text messages about getting involved have emerged with hundreds of thousands of followers.

Politics:

  • Former politicians are getting involved. Barbara Boxer's Fight Back PAC is establishing itself against Trump's agenda but also as a movement to win votes for progressives.
  • Trump's disapproval rating is on the rise: 57% - Quinnipiac, 55% - Gallup Daily Tracker, 52% - Economist/YouGov, 49% - Marist
  • Congressional town halls and protests have been flooded with angry voices over what has been dubbed the 'resistance recess.' The movement was loud enough to get a response via twitter from President Trump.
  • Activism among liberal democrats is on the rise:47% of liberal Dems report say they've gotten involved in the last past two months, compared to 23% of all adults.Liberal Dems, more than any other group, anticipate taking part in activism in the next two years

Peaceful protests:

  • The Women's March on Washington had nearly 600 reported marches across the country, roughly 500,000 protesters at each, and rallies in 100 cities across the globe.
  • A day without immigrants and women closed businesses, emptied offices, and brought nationwide rallies.
  • The tax march saw rallies across 150 cities nationwide, with the support of roughly 70 organizations.

Cultural:

  • Olivia Wilde: "Stop telling me to 'get over it.' Get UNDER it. He works for US. The democratic process is constant. Stay informed, stay engaged, speak up."
  • Alicia Keys: ".@realDonaldTrump Americans are all colors, faiths, cultures & genders. We have voices. We refuse fear. We believe in the Dream. #WeAreHere"
  • Mahershala Ali at the SAG Awards: "[W]hen we get caught up in the minutiae and the details that make us all different, I think there's two ways of seeing that. There's the opportunity to see the texture of that person...then there's an opportunity to go to war about it"
  • Meryl Streep at the Golden Globes: "It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter. Someone he outranked in privilege, power and the capacity to fight back."
  • Jimmy Kimmel at the Oscars: "Now it's time for something that is very rare today: a president that believes in both arts and sciences."
  • Killer Mike, in an interview with Snapchat's Peter Hamby: "Artists, musicians, I think it is just naturally in us to exude a form of protest...you have to take that out into the world."

Go deeper

China tries to contain coronavirus, as Apple warns of earnings impact

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's NHC; Note: China refers to mainland China and the Diamond Princess is the cruise ship offshore Yokohama, Japan. Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

As China pushes to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus — placing around 780 million people under travel restrictions, per CNN — the economic repercussions continue to be felt globally as companies like Apple warn of the impact from the lack of manufacturing and consumer demand in China.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 1,775 people and infected more than 70,000 others, mostly in mainland China. There are some signs that new cases are growing at a slower rate now, although the World Health Organization said Monday it's "too early to tell" if this will continue.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 hours ago - Health

Apple will miss quarterly earnings estimates due to coronavirus

Apple CEO Tim Cook

Apple issued a rare earnings warning on Monday, saying it would not meet quarterly revenue expectations due to the impact of the coronavirus, which will limit iPhone production and limit product demand in China.

Why it matters: Lots of companies rely on China for production, but unlike most U.S. tech companies, Apple also gets a significant chunk of its revenue from sales in China.

America's dwindling executions

The Trump administration wants to reboot federal executions, pointing to a 16-year lapse, but Pew Research reports the government has only executed three people since 1963.

The big picture: Nearly all executions in the U.S. are done by states. Even those have been steadily dropping for two decades, per the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) — marking a downward trend for all executions in the country.