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Rick Gates pleads guilty to conspiracy, lying to investigators

Rick Gates
Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Appearing in court today, former Trump campaign aide Rick Gates pled guilty to one count of conspiracy against the United States and one count of making false statements to the FBI and to the Special Counsel at a meeting last month. In preparation for the guilty plea, Robert Mueller filed superseding criminal information earlier today which alleged Gates and Manafort laundered tens of millions of dollars that they earned through their work for the Ukrainian government.

Why it matters: Mueller now has the cooperation of a key player who worked closely with the Trump campaign, and stayed on the team even after Manafort resigned as campaign manager. Manafort released a statement today maintaining his innocence, but the pressure is at an all-time high now that his former partner is ready to talk.

What's next: Federal guidelines suggest Gates will face a sentence of 57 to 71 months, but these are only advisory and are subject to discretion, per Bloomberg. Gates' status hearing is for May 14, indicating the Mueller probe has no intention of winding down before then.

Kim Hart 9 hours ago
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Tech's terrible week

A sad computer
Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

From a fatal car crash to a data nightmare, turning-point scenarios played out in several corners of the technology industry this week.

Why it matters: The utopian promise of technological progress is giving way to the very thorny challenges of balancing innovation with social accountability. That means congressional hearings, investigations, probably at least some regulation — and a lot more skepticism about the promise of the tech-driven changes that are transforming our lives.

Haley Britzky 6 hours ago
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Students prep for protests: "We have nothing to lose"

People arrive early for the March For Our Lives rally against gun violence in Washington, DC.
People arrive early for the March For Our Lives rally against gun violence in Washington, DC. Photo: Alex Edelman / AFP / Getty Images

On Saturday, more than 800 March for our Lives protests are expected "in every American state and on every continent except for Antarctica," the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The Parkland shooting was the tipping point for many, leading to a surge of the #NeverAgain movement led mostly by young people. Saturday can expect "more than half a million people" in D.C.'s march alone, the NYT reports, along with counter-protests, celebrities, and voting registration.