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Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo. Photo: Barry Chin/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (D) issued an executive order Tuesday to eliminate the word "plantations" from state documents, symbols and related government websites.

Why it matters: The state seal includes a golden anchor along with the word "hope" and the phrase "the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations." Rhode Island was one of the original 13 colonies, with Providence Plantations founded in 1636.

The big picture: Governors and state legislators are engaging in debates regarding statues and symbols that glorify the Confederacy or slavery in their states.

  • Earlier this month, Raimondo said she wanted to put the removal of "Providence Plantations" from the state name on the ballot in November.

What they're saying:

"We can't ignore the image conjured by the word 'plantations.' We can't ignore how painful that is for Black Rhode Islanders to see that and have to see that as part of their state's name."
— Gina Raimondo at a press conference
"The State of Rhode Island and 'Providence Plantations' has been the state's recorded name since conception, but the change is just one step toward unity and progress and away from controversial history. I think a word like plantations is a trigger that I think it's good to eliminate it because it brings people together."
— NAACP Providence president Jim Vincent, per NBC affiliate in Boston

The other side: Rhode Island GOP chair Sue Cienki told the NBC affiliate in Providence that voters should ultimately decide whether to change the state's formal name and seal.

  • "I certainly understand her sentiment for wanting to change it, but I don't agree with the way she went about it by doing it by executive order," Cienki said.
  • In 2010, the motion to remove "Providence Plantations" was rejected by voters.

Go deeper: Washington, D.C.'s only Confederate statue sacked during protest

Go deeper

Trump pressures Barr to release so-called Durham report

Bill Barr. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump and his allies are piling extreme pressure on Attorney General Bill Barr to release a report that Trump believes could hurt perceived Obama-era enemies — and view Barr's designation of John Durham as special counsel as a stall tactic, sources familiar with the conversations tell Axios.

Why it matters: Speculation over Barr's fate grew on Tuesday, with just 49 days remaining in Trump's presidency, after Barr gave an interview to the Associated Press in which he said the Justice Department has not uncovered evidence of widespread fraud that could change the election's outcome.

CDC to cut guidance on quarantine period for coronavirus exposure

A health care worker oversees cars as people arrive to get tested for coronavirus at a testing site in Arlington, Virginia, on Tuesday. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The CDC will soon shorten its guidance for quarantine periods following exposure to COVID-19, AP reported Tuesday and Axios can confirm.

Why it matters: Quarantine helps prevent the spread of the coronavirus, which can occur before a person knows they're sick or if they're infected without feeling any symptoms. The current recommended period to stay home if exposed to the virus is 14 days. The CDC plans to amend this to 10 days or seven with a negative test, an official told Axios.

  • The CDC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
4 hours ago - Health

CDC panel: COVID vaccines should go to health workers, long-term care residents first

Hospital staff work in the COVID-19 intensive care unit in Houston. Photo: Go Nakamura via Getty

Health-care workers and nursing home residents should be at the front of the line to get coronavirus vaccines in the United States once they’re cleared and available for public use, an independent CDC panel recommended in a 13-1 emergency vote on Tuesday, per CNBC.

Why it matters: Recent developments in COVID-19 vaccines have accelerated the timeline for distribution as vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna undergo the federal approval process. States are preparing to begin distributing as soon as two weeks from now.