Jan 3, 2018

Revised lawsuit accuses Google of gender pay discrimination

Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Four former Google employees claim in a revised gender-pay lawsuit filed on Wednesday that the company asked about their prior salaries, a practice now banned in California, and underpaid them compared with their male counterparts, the AP reports.

Why it matters: This comes almost a month after a San Francisco judge dismissed the initial version of the suit because the plaintiffs failed to show that Google's alleged practice applied to an entire class of people — all women in California who have worked for the company. The new version, seeking class-action status, has a more limited scope, per AP.

The other side: Google spokeswoman Gina Scigliano told the AP in a statement that the company disagrees with the allegations. "Job levels and promotions are determined through rigorous hiring and promotion committees, and must pass multiple levels of review, including checks to make sure there is no bias in these decisions," she said.

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Premier League players launch fund to help U.K. medical workers

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Premier League players have launched an initiative called #PlayersTogether, which will funnel part of their salaries to the National Health Service to support the U.K.'s front-line workers during the coronavirus crisis.

Why it matters: This decision came at the conclusion of a protracted argument between players, clubs and even government officials over who should bear the brunt of lost revenue in the midst of the pandemic.

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GOP worries Trump has only weeks to sharpen coronavirus response

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Republicans are increasingly concerned not only about President Trump’s daily briefings but also his broader plan to ease the nation out of the virus crisis and back to work. This concern is acute — and spreading. 

Why it matters: Trump can easily address the briefing worries by doing fewer, but the lackluster bounce-back planning is what worries Republicans most. 

Pandemic forces startups to shift gears

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Spaces CEO Brad Herman had an early warning about COVID-19 because his startup supplies VR attractions to a number of theme parks in China. Realizing that the business he spent the last few years building was going to evaporate, Herman quickly found a new way to apply his team's know-how: helping companies host Zoom teleconferences in VR.

Why it matters: Many startups are rethinking the viability of their core businesses in the wake of the coronavirus. Spaces' move is one of many such pivots likely to crop up in the coming months.