New research shows retail investors are also moved to make stock purchases by ads they see on TV.

What it means: In a new paper, researchers at Cornell and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology find a "predictable, recurring, and robust pattern between investor exposure to television commercials and subsequent retail stock trading."

  • And the impact of TV ads on stock prices is "more far reaching than previously believed."

Details: "Within 15 minutes of seeing an ad for a firm’s product or service, investors begin searching for financial information on that firm’s stock."

  • "This surge of attention leads to a higher trading volume of the advertiser’s stock the following day — and contributes to a temporary rise in the stock price of that firm."

The bottom line: "We found that each dollar spent on advertising translated to roughly 40 cents of additional trading volume in the advertiser’s stock."

Go deeper: The phenomenon of the television ad as investment tip

Go deeper

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Aug 27, 2020 - Economy & Business

A tale of two direct listings

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

This was a big week for you, if you're a Facebook billionaire looking to take your money-losing post-Facebook company public by doing a direct listing of shares on the New York Stock Exchange.

Details: Asana was founded by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz in 2008; Palantir was founded by Facebook investor and board member Peter Thiel in 2003. Both companies released their full financials this week.

Louisville officer: "Breonna Taylor would be alive" if we had served no-knock warrant

Breonna Taylor memorial in Louisville. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, the Louisville officer who led the botched police raid that caused the death of Breonna Taylor, said the No. 1 thing he wishes he had done differently is either served a "no-knock" warrant or given five to 10 seconds before entering the apartment: "Breonna Taylor would be alive, 100 percent."

Driving the news: Mattingly, who spoke to ABC News and Louisville's Courier Journal for his public interview, was shot in the leg in the initial moments of the March 13 raid. Mattingly did not face any charges after Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said he and another officer were "justified" in returning fire to protect themselves against Taylor's boyfriend.

U.S. vs. Google — the siege begins

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Justice Department fired the starter pistol on what's likely to be a years-long legal siege of Big Tech by the U.S. government when it filed a major antitrust suit Tuesday against Google.

The big picture: Once a generation, it seems, federal regulators decide to take on a dominant tech company. Two decades ago, Microsoft was the target; two decades before that, IBM.