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Photo: Andrew Harrer, Pool / Getty Images

President Donald Trump said suggested that the Nunes memo “totally vindicates ‘Trump’" and shows the Russia probe is a "witch hunt." But at least three Republicans pushed back against that assertion on Sunday, including Rep. Trey Gowdy, who was actively involved with the drafting of the controversial memo that alleged abuse of government surveillance powers.

Why it matters: The three Republicans, all members of the House Intelligence Committee, voted for the released the memo on Friday. They all said the memo should not impact Robert Mueller’s investigation.

What they’re saying:

Rep. Gowdy, the only Republican on the panel who saw the classified intelligence used to write the memo, said on CBS’ “Face the Nation” that the document has has no effect on potential links between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin. Gowdy also said he has complete confidence in FBI Director Wray, Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein and Special Counsel Mueller.

Rep. Chris Stewart of Utah said on "Fox News Sunday" that Trump hadn't been vindicated:

"I think it would be a mistake for anyone to suggest that the special counsel shouldn't complete his work. I support his work. I want him to finish it. I hope he finishes it as quickly as possible. ... The essence of this memo is something quite different ...."

Rep. Will Hurd of Texas on ABCs 'This Week:"

"I would say that DOJ and the FBI should continue doing their job. I don’t believe this is an attack on Bob Mueller. I don’t believe this is an attack on the men and women in the FBI. I’ve served shoulder to shoulder with them and they are hard-working folks that keep us safe."

Go deeper: Between the lines of the Nunes memo.

Go deeper

Updated 52 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Health: Trump received COVID vaccine at White House in January — CDC director warns "now is not the time" to lift COVID restrictions.
  2. Education: More schools are reopening in the U.S.
  3. Vaccine: J&J CEO "absolutely" confident in vaccine distribution goals Most states aren't prioritizing prisons for COVID vaccines — Vaccine hesitancy is shrinking.
  4. Economy: Apple says all U.S. stores open for the first time since start of pandemic — What's really going on with the labor market.
  5. Sports: Poll weighs impact of athlete vaccination.
  6. World: Latin America turns to China and Russia for COVID-19 vaccines.
Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Latin America turns to China and Russia for COVID-19 vaccines

Several countries in the Americas have received their first vaccine shipments over the past few weeks — not from the regional superpower or from Western pharmaceutical giants, but from China, Russia, and in some cases India.

Why it matters: North and South America have been battered by the pandemic and recorded several of the world’s highest death tolls. Few countries other than the U.S. have the capacity to manufacture vaccines at scale, and most lack the resources to buy their way to the front of the line for imports. That’s led to a scramble for whatever supply is available.

More schools are reopening in the U.S.

Students settle into a classroom in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

More than 72% of K-12 students are now attending schools that offer in-person or hybrid models of learning.

The big picture: The U.S. is seeing an almost-universal return of schools that were in-person as of November, as well as a gradual return in parts of the country that had been virtual for almost a year.