Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

GOP leadership has officially named the Republican members of the House Intelligence Committee, four weeks after the new Democratic-controlled Congress took office.

Why it matters: The panel was the final House committee to be filled by Republicans, with the delay hampering the ability of the Democratic majority to start conducting business and issuing subpoenas related to the Trump-Russia investigation. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the new chair of the committee, has pledged to reopen the Russia probe in light of the indictments of several Trump associates, and said his first order of business would be to hand over all witness transcripts to the Mueller investigation.

Republicans:

  • Rep. Devin Nunes (Ranking member)
  • Rep. Mike Conaway
  • Rep. Mike Turner
  • Rep. Brad Wenstrup
  • Rep. Chris Stewart
  • Rep. Rick Crawford
  • Rep. Elise Stefanik
  • Rep. Will Hurd
  • Rep. John Ratcliffe

Democrats:

  • Rep. Adam Schiff (Chairman)
  • Rep. Jim Himes
  • Rep. Terri Sewell
  • Rep. André Carson
  • Rep. Jackie Speier
  • Rep. Mike Quigley
  • Rep. Eric Swalwell
  • Rep. Joaquin Castro
  • Rep. Denny Heck
  • Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney
  • Rep. Val Demings
  • Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi
  • Rep. Peter Welch

Go deeper: Democrats load "subpoena cannon" with 85+ Trump targets

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Special report: Trump's hopes of nuclear deal with Putin come down to the wire

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

A surprise offer from Vladimir Putin has the U.S. and Russia once again circling a potential pre-election nuclear deal.

The big picture: The last treaty constraining the U.S. and Russia, New START, is due to expire on Feb. 5, 2021, two weeks after the next U.S. presidential inauguration. For the first time since the height of the Cold War, the nuclear guardrails could come off.

The cliffhanger could be ... Georgia

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992, but Georgia's changing demographics may prove pivotal this year — not only to Trump v. Biden, but also to whether Democrats take control of the Senate.

Why it matters: If the fate of the Senate did hinge on Georgia, it might be January before we know the outcome. Meanwhile, voters' understanding of this power in the final days of the election could juice turnout enough to impact presidential results.

Amy Harder, author of Generate
7 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.