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A group of teenagers take a selfie in Times Square, New York CIty. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

Despite rising concern in both Silicon Valley and beyond about screen time overload, a new Pew Research Center report shows a large majority of teenagers believe using social media is good for them.

Why it matters: A lot of research into the relationship between young people and social media has drawn negative conclusions: social media is anxiety-inducing, creates unrealistic body images, and promotes cyberbullying and ideological bubbles, BuzzFeed reports. But teens themselves apparently disagree.

Some 45% of teens say they're on the internet constantly, causing them to be the driving force of what apps and what sites are popular, per Pew. Some Millennials have built their own businesses out of social media as their generation matures.

By the numbers: In the report, 743 teens were surveyed about the benefits and negatives of social media use.

  • 81% of teens said social media makes them feel more connected to friends.
  • 71% said it helps them show their creative side.
  • 69% said it helps them make friends and with a more diverse group of people.
  • 68% feel like they have people who support them through tough times.
  • Still, 45% of teens said they feel overwhelmed by the drama on social media, with 13% saying they feel that way “a lot.”

One communication thing: As previously reported, face-to-face interaction and communication is becoming less preferred by teenagers, according to a survey of 13- to 17-year-olds by Common Sense Media.

  • Teens say they are aware of social media's inhibiting impact on in-person communication, and yet a majority say they hardly ever or never put their devices away when hanging out with friends.

Go deeper

Schumer's m(aj)ority checklist

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitalizing on the Georgia runoffs, achieving a 50-50 Senate and launching an impeachment trial are weighty to-dos for getting Joe Biden's administration up and running on Day One.

What to watch: A blend of ceremonies, hearings and legal timelines will come into play on Tuesday and Wednesday so Chuck Schumer can actually claim the Senate majority and propel the new president's agenda.

The dark new reality in Congress

National Guard troops keep watch at security fencing. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

This is how bad things are for elected officials and others working in a post-insurrection Congress:

  • Rep. Norma Torres (D-Calif.) said she had a panic attack while grocery shopping back home.
  • Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said police may also have to be at his constituent meetings.
  • Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) told a podcaster he brought a gun to his office on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 because he anticipated trouble with the proceedings that day.
Off the Rails

Episode 3: Descent into madness ... Trump: "Sometimes you need a little crazy"

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 3: The conspiracy goes too far. Trump's outside lawyers plot to seize voting machines and spin theories about communists, spies and computer software.

President Trump was sitting in the Oval Office one day in late November when a call came in from lawyer Sidney Powell. "Ugh, Sidney," he told the staff in the room before he picked up. "She's getting a little crazy, isn't she? She's really gotta tone it down. No one believes this stuff. It's just too much."