Jacquelyn Martin / AP

FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe plans to retire in March "when he becomes fully eligible for pension benefits" according to a new report from the Washington Post.

Why it matters: McCabe is reportedly going to retire early because of the intense criticism he's received from Republicans, particularly as Special Counsel Bob Mueller's investigation has widened. And that scrutiny picked up after Trump abruptly fired former FBI Director James Comey because conservatives and Republicans wanted him to answer for Comey's decisions.

"The pressure on McCabe has only intensified," WashPost notes. The House Intelligence Committee recently questioned him for eight hours and two days after he went to Congress where he answered nine hours' worth of questions from the House Judiciary and Oversight committees.

Republicans are particularly mad at the FBI over their almost-relationship with the author behind the Trump-Russia dossier. After the 2016 election, the FBI reportedly offered to pay "to keep pursuing leads and information, but the agreement was never finalized," per WashPost.

Earlier today, from Axios AM: President Trump's public lashing of the FBI, and the criticism by normally supportive Republican members of Congress, have damaged bureau morale, the N.Y. Times reports:

Director Christopher Wray, trying to move past his predecessor's era, "has kept a low profile, making sure his anodyne speeches inside and outside the F.B.I. do not inflame the White House."

Go deeper

"Not enough": Protesters react to no murder charges in Breonna Taylor case

A grand jury on Wednesday indicted Brett Hankison, one of the Louisville police officers who entered Breonna Taylor's home in March, on three counts of wanton endangerment for firing shots blindly into neighboring apartments.

Details: Angering protesters, the grand jury did not indict any of the three officers involved in the botched drug raid on homicide or manslaughter charges related to the death of Taylor.

Two officers shot in Louisville amid Breonna Taylor protests

Police officers stand guard during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Ben Hendren/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Louisville Metro Police Department said two officers were shot downtown in the Kentucky city late Wednesday, just hours after a grand jury announced an indictment in the Breonna Taylor case.

Details: A police spokesperson told a press briefing a suspect was in custody and that the injuries of both officers were not life-threatening. One officer was "alert and stable" and the other was undergoing surgery, he said.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 31,778,331 — Total deaths: 974,436 — Total recoveries: 21,876,025Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 6,943,078 — Total deaths: 201,930 — Total recoveries: 2,670,256 — Total tests: 97,459,742Map.
  3. Health: CDC director says over 90% of Americans have not yet been exposed to coronavirus — Supply shortages continue to plague testing.
  4. Politics: Missouri Gov. Mike Parson tests positive for coronavirus — Poll says 51% of Republicans trust Trump on coronavirus more than the CDC.
  5. Technology: The tech solutions of 2020 may be sapping our resolve to beat the coronavirus
  6. Vaccines: Johnson & Johnson begins large phase 3 trial — The FDA plans to toughen standards.
  7. Sports: Less travel is causing the NBA to see better basketball.
  8. Future: America's halfway coronavirus response

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!