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Photo: Michel Spingler / AP

Amazon is consulting industry experts about procuring rights to England's top live sport: soccer. The Seattle-based tech giant has its eyes Premier League rights for the three years between 2019-2022, according to The Daily Telegraph. Amazon would position itself against two of England's top live sports channels, Sky TV and BT, in a bid for the rights.

Why it matters: It's a sign that Amazon is interested in continuing to build a portfolio of worldwide sports rights to increase its Prime membership and user engagement with its services. As it build its advertising business, user adoption and time spent with its content will become crucial in ensuring it can produce enough ad inventory to sell sponsorships and ad placements.

Amazon has been bidding for live sports rights domestically for some time. Most notably, it won the Thursday Night Football contract from the NFL for $50 million during the 2017 season. In November it secured exclusive UK rights to cover the final grand slam of the U.S. open for the next five years.

Tech giants have increasingly been bidding for national and international sports streaming rights, as a way to capture attention from audiences worldwide and sell ads against those eyeballs. Facebook secured the streaming rights for MLS and MLB games. Twitter has struck partnerships with the NBA and NFL for highlight shows. Snapchat has secured dozens of rights to footage for sports across the globe, including the Dubai World Cup and Australian Open.

Go deeper

Cold December as safety nets expire

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Safety nets are likely to be yanked from underneath millions of vulnerable Americans in December, as the coronavirus surges.

Why it matters: Those most at risk are depending on one or more relief programs that are set to expire, right as the economic recovery becomes more fragile than it's been in months.

15 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

17 hours ago - Health

AstraZeneca CEO: "We need to do an additional study" on COVID vaccine

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot said on Thursday the company is likely to start a new global trial to measure how effective its coronavirus vaccine is, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: Following Phase 3 trials, Oxford and AstraZeneca said their vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses.