Michael Dwyer / AP

Amazon has been considering locating its second headquarters in Boston, a person briefed on the matter told Bloomberg. That push is coming from "several senior" Amazon executives, Bloomberg's Spencer Soper reports.

Why it matters: Amazon says its new headquarters will cost $5 billion and create 50,000 jobs over about 15 to 17 years.

A source briefed on the matter said Boston's advantages include its proximity to Harvard and MIT, direct flights to Seattle and Washington, D.C. and a lower cost of living than some other big cities. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh was enthusiastic last week about Amazon's search, tweeting that it was "an incredible opportunity."

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Update: Amazon has now replied to the report on Twitter saying, "Bloomberg is incorrect - there are no front-runners at this point. We're just getting started & every city is on equal playing field"

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Trump floats executive action even if stimulus deal is reached

Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The White House is finalizing a series of executive orders addressing key coronavirus stimulus priorities if negotiations with Congress fall apart, and it's leaving the door open for President Trump to use them even if a deal is reached that doesn't encompass all of his priorities, two administration officials tell Axios.

What we’re hearing: “I wouldn't be surprised that, if something gets left off the table, we’d be like ‘we can take this executive action too and be able to win on it anyway,’” one official said.

9 mins ago - Technology

TikTok responds to Trump executive order: "We are shocked"

Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

TikTok said Friday that it was "shocked" by President Trump's executive order that will ban Americans from dealing with ByteDance, its China-based owner, in 45 days.

Why it matters: TikTok argued that Trump's move "risks undermining global businesses' trust in the United States' commitment to the rule of law, which has served as a magnet for investment and spurred decades of American economic growth."

U.S. economy adds 1.8 million jobs in July

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. added 1.8 million jobs last month, while the unemployment rate fell to 10.2% from 11.1% in June, the Labor Department said on Friday.

Why it matters: The labor market continued to recover but the pace of job growth slowed significantly from June’s 4.8 million job gain, suggesting a stalled improvement as coronavirus cases surged and states pulled back on reopening plans.