Photo: Axios screenshot

Even with the many companies that are working tirelessly to produce a vaccine to treat COVID-19, Rep. Ann Kuster (D-N.H.) said she wants to resolve any inequities in production and distribution for Americans who need it most, during an Axios virtual event on Wednesday.

What they're saying: "We have the best science in the world and we have terrific manufacturing in place. What we really need is leadership. Leadership from the top. ... I want to make sure they have the support of Congress, and that people like Dr. Fauci at the NIH and Dr. Redfield at the CDC are the people we’re taking our cues from, not to politicians that may not be honest with the American people."

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97,000 children test positive for coronavirus in two weeks

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At least 97,000 children tested positive for COVID-19 in the final two weeks of July and there's been an estimated 338,000 cases involving kids in the U.S. since the pandemic began, a new report finds.

Why it matters: The report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children's Hospital Association comes as schools and day cares look to reopen in the U.S.

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Driving the news: California public health director Dr. Sonia Angell resigned on Sunday without explanation, a few days after the state fixed a delay in reporting coronavirus test results that had affected reopenings for schools and businesses, AP reports.

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Photo: Stan Grossfeld/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

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