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Matt Rourke / AP

While 19 or so GOP members of Congress, including John McCain, have condemned Trump's travel order for being too broad, most Republican lawmakers support it. The Washington Post has counted up 37 GOP members who partially support the ban, but have reservations and 84 who support it, including...

  • House Speaker Paul Ryan: He said today, "The President has a responsibility to the security of this country.... What is happening is something that we support, which is: We need to pause and we need to make sure that the vetting standards are up to snuff so we can guarantee the safety and security of our country. That is what this does." He added, "I think it's regrettable that there was some confusion on the rollout of this."
  • House Majority Whip Steve Scalise:

"The most important point is that President Trump ran on this. This is something he said he would do to protect America, to keep America safe from countries that can not be vetted when they're sending people to our nation."

  • Sen. Tom Cotton: "It's simply wrong to call the president's executive order concerning immigration and refugees 'a religious test' of any kind. I doubt many Arkansans or Americans more broadly object to taking a harder look at foreigners coming into our country from war-torn nations with known terror networks," he said, according to the Hill.
  • House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Edward Royce: "Pausing the intake of refugees from terror hot spots is the right call to keep America safe. I hope cases of individuals with visas traveling as this executive action went into effect — including some who served alongside U.S. troops — will be resolved quickly," he said according to WashPo.
  • Rep. Chris Collins:
  • Rep. Jeff Duncan
  • Rep. Pete Sessions:

Go deeper

Updated 16 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden to sign 15 executive actions on Day One

President-elect Joe Biden. Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is expected to sign 15 executive actions upon taking office Wednesday, immediately reversing key Trump administration policies.

Why it matters: The 15 actions — aimed at issues like climate change and immigration — mark more drastic immediate steps compared with the two day-one actions from Biden's four predecessors combined, according to incoming White House press secretary Jen Psaki.

Mike Allen, author of AM
17 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The Swamp wins

President Trump on Jan. 28, 2017, with two aides he later pardoned — national security adviser Michael Flynn and strategist Steve Bannon. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

It was 12:50 a.m. on Inauguration Day when President Trump announced 143 pardons and commutations — including a pardon for Steve Bannon. 17 minutes later, the White House released an executive order that said it all about his failure to "drain the Swamp," as he'd promised in the '16 campaign.

Driving the news: Trump revoked an executive order, signed eight days after he took office, that limits his appointees' lobbying for five years after leaving the administration.

Trump stock market underperformed Obama's

Data: Yahoo Finance; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

U.S. stock markets hit record highs during President Trump's time in office, but mostly underperformed his predecessor.

By the numbers: The stock market selloff that followed the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic wiped out three and a half years' worth of market gains for Trump. As of March 23, 2020, the S&P 500 had lost 1.5% since Trump's first day in office.