Jan 31, 2017

Remember, most Republicans still support Trump's ban

Matt Rourke / AP

While 19 or so GOP members of Congress, including John McCain, have condemned Trump's travel order for being too broad, most Republican lawmakers support it. The Washington Post has counted up 37 GOP members who partially support the ban, but have reservations and 84 who support it, including...

  • House Speaker Paul Ryan: He said today, "The President has a responsibility to the security of this country.... What is happening is something that we support, which is: We need to pause and we need to make sure that the vetting standards are up to snuff so we can guarantee the safety and security of our country. That is what this does." He added, "I think it's regrettable that there was some confusion on the rollout of this."
  • House Majority Whip Steve Scalise:

"The most important point is that President Trump ran on this. This is something he said he would do to protect America, to keep America safe from countries that can not be vetted when they're sending people to our nation."

  • Sen. Tom Cotton: "It's simply wrong to call the president's executive order concerning immigration and refugees 'a religious test' of any kind. I doubt many Arkansans or Americans more broadly object to taking a harder look at foreigners coming into our country from war-torn nations with known terror networks," he said, according to the Hill.
  • House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Edward Royce: "Pausing the intake of refugees from terror hot spots is the right call to keep America safe. I hope cases of individuals with visas traveling as this executive action went into effect — including some who served alongside U.S. troops — will be resolved quickly," he said according to WashPo.
  • Rep. Chris Collins:
  • Rep. Jeff Duncan
  • Rep. Pete Sessions:

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Minneapolis will ban police chokeholds following George Floyd's death

A memorial for George Floyd at the site of his death in Minneapolis. Photo: Steel Brooks/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Minneapolis has agreed to ban the use of police chokeholds and will require nearby officers to act to stop them in the wake of George Floyd's death, AP reports.

Why it matters: The agreement between the city and the Minnesota Department of Human Rights, which has launched an investigation into Floyd's death while in police custody, will be enforceable in court.

Better-than-expected jobs report boosts stock market

Data: Yahoo Finance; Chart: Axios

The S&P 500 jumped nearly 3% on Friday after a stronger-than-expected May jobs report showed that an economic recovery could be underway.

The state of play: Stocks have rallied since the worst of the coronavirus sell-off ended in late March and looked past a spate of ugly economic reports — not to mention civil unrest.

The Athletic lays off 8% of staff, implements company-wide pay cut

Adam Hansmann (left) and Alex Mather (right), co-founders of The Athletic. Photo: Steph Gray, courtesy of The Athletic

The Athletic is laying off nearly 8% of staff, 46 people, according to an internal memo obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: It's the latest media company that's been been forced to take drastic measures to survive the economic fallout from the coronavirus. Like many sports media outlets, The Athletic has been particularly impacted by the loss of live sports.