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The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute has asked the Trump campaign and Republican National Committee to stop using Ronald Reagan's name, image and likeness to raise money for President Trump's 2020 re-election, the Washington Post first reported.

The state of play: The request came after the Trump campaign and RNC began selling two commemorative coins — one with Reagan's image and the other with Trump's — for anyone who donated $45 or more to Trump's campaign.

  • The foundation can't stop every group and individual using Reagan's name and likeness, but it claims the right to stop groups from using it for political or commercial gain, according to the Post.
  • Trump has often drawn parallels between himself and Reagan, and his "Make America Great Again" campaign slogan is an adaptation of one used by Reagan in the 1980s.

What they're saying: Frederick Ryan, chair of the board of trustees of the Reagan foundation, is also the CEO and publisher of the Washington Post. Trump tweeted on Sunday: "So the Washington Post is running the Reagan Foundation, and RINO Paul Ryan is on the Board of Fox, which has been terrible. We will win anyway, even with the phony @FoxNews suppression polls (which have been seriously wrong for 5 years)!"

  • Trump tweeted later in the evening that people "are not happy" about Ryan, being the chair, adding: "The Washington Post is a political front for Amazon. Nobody treated Ronald Reagan worse!"

Editor's note: This article has been updated with Trump's later comments.

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