Michel Euler / AP

A hardline immigration leader (somebody whose work has strongly influenced top Trump adviser Jeff Sessions and Stephen Miller) told Axios recently to read some of May's previous speeches on immigration. He was majorly impressed.

The British PM enjoys significant goodwill among Trump's nationalist allies, particularly due to her tougher positions on immigration. She's no Nigel Farage, the UKIP leader and spearhead of the Brexit movement, but she's regarded warily as a potential friend of Trump's nationalist populist movement.

Key sections of a famous May speech in 2015 below:

"There are millions of people in poorer countries who would love to live in Britain, and there is a limit to the amount of immigration any country can and should take."... "When immigration is too high, when the pace of change is too fast, it's impossible to build a cohesive society." ... "It's difficult for schools and hospitals and core infrastructure like housing and transport to cope." ... "We know that for people in low-paid jobs, wages are forced down even further while some people are forced out of work altogether." ... "It's often said – usually by advocates of open-door immigration – that Britain is by definition a country of immigrants. In fact, compared to the countries of the New World and compared to the countries of Europe with their shifting land borders, we have until recently always been a country of remarkable population stability."

What it Means: It's not difficult to see how May could get along famously, not only with Trump, but with Bannon and fellow nationalists in Trump's inner circle, like Jeff Sessions and Stephen Miller.

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