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The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's on Friday has prompted a look-back on her life and career as engineer of the legal fight for women's rights.

The big picture: Ginsburg's death initiates what's likely to be a tumultuous political fight over her successor, and propels the court vacancy into the forefront of the presidential race.

A look at her life:

In Manhattan, this painting is in a storefront on Broadway. Photo: Andrew Kelly/Reuters
On Aug. 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg takes the oath from Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) during an East Room ceremony with President Clinton. Ginsburg's late husband, Martin holds the Bible.
RBG and her husband, John Ginsburg, attend a gala dinner in 2000. Photo: Karin Cooper/Liaison
RBG receives an honorary degree from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in 2004. Photo: Ramin Talaie/Corbis via Getty Images
RBG in 2013. Photo: Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images
RBG arriving for President Obama's State of the Union in 2015. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call
RBG with her fellow Supreme Court judges. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Mourners gather at the Supreme Court on Sept. 18. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Go deeper

Dec 24, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Tale of two Cabinets: Biden vs Trump

Here's a side-by-side look at President-elect Biden's Cabinet so far, paired with President Trump's debut Cabinet from 2017.

DOJ watchdog to probe whether officials sought to alter election results

Donald and Melania Trump exit Air Force One in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Jan. 20. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department's inspector general will investigate whether any current or former DOJ officials "engaged in an improper attempt to have DOJ seek to alter the outcome" of the 2020 election, the agency announced Monday.

Driving the news: The investigation comes in the wake of a New York Times report that alleged Jeffrey Clark, the head of DOJ's civil division, had plotted with President Trump to oust acting Attorney General Jeffery Rosen in a scheme to overturn the election results in Georgia.

2 hours ago - Podcasts

Google's chief health officer Karen DeSalvo on vaccinating America

Google on Monday became the latest Big Tech company to get involved with COVID-19 vaccinations. Not just by doing things like incorporating vaccination sites into its maps, but by helping to turn some of its offices and parking lots into vaccination sites.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper into what Google is doing, and why now, with Dr. Karen DeSalvo, Google's chief health officer who previously worked at HHS and as health commissioner for New Orleans.