Paul says it’s not a perfect tax bill, but it has changed for the better. Photo: AP file

Sen. Rand Paul is one Republican the GOP leadership and the White House won’t have to worry about when the Senate votes on the tax bill later this week. "I'm not getting everything I want — far from it,” Paul wrote in an opinion piece for Fox News. “[But] I've fought for and received major changes for the better — and I plan to vote for this bill as it stands right now.”

Why this matters: The piece shows a pragmatic side to Paul that many in leadership and the administration have been hoping for. Paul was never on the list of senators that Republican leaders were most worried about. But, as a source close to leadership told me on the weekend: "You never know with Rand.”

What he meant by that is that Paul has voted against the president on major items this year, including the attempt to repeal and replace parts of the Affordable Care Act.

Behind the scenes: Even though Paul has stymied parts of the GOP agenda, President Trump regards him as one of his closest friends in the Senate. They talk regularly by the phone and golf together. Trump has always insisted to sometimes skeptical associates that "Rand will be with us" on tax cuts.

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state in Capitol's National Statuary Hall

Photo: Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Monday that the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state in the Capitol's National Statuary Hall on Friday, making Ginsburg the first woman to ever receive the honor.

The state of play: The Supreme Court also announced Monday that Ginsburg will lie in repose on the front steps of the building on Wednesday and Thursday, allowing the public to pay respects to the late justice outside.

18 mins ago - World

Trump announces new Iran sanctions in effort to maintain international arms embargo

Photo: Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

President Trump signed an executive order on Monday that would impose sanctions on any person or entity that contributes to the supply, sale, or transfer of conventional arms to or from Iran or is engaged in providing training and financial support related to those weapons.

Why it matters: The executive order is the first step by the Trump administration to put teeth into its claim that international sanctions on Iran were restored over the weekend, one month after the U.S. initiated the "snapback" process under a United Nations Security Council resolution.

Exclusive: Conservative group launches $2M Supreme Court ad

Screengrab of ad, courtesy of Judicial Crisis Network.

The Judicial Crisis Network is launching a $2.2 million ad campaign to put pressure on vulnerable Senate Republicans in battleground states to support a quick confirmation when President Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee.

The big picture: "Follow Precedent," previewed by Axios, is one of the first national and cable television ads to run following Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg's death Friday.