Sep 6, 2019

Black women are more likely to die from a pregnancy

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Data: CDC; Chart: Axios Visuals

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a report yesterday showing that black and American Indian women are much more likely than white, Asian and Hispanic women to die pregnancy-related deaths.

The big picture: The trend held in states with the lowest maternal mortality rates and among women with higher levels of education, "demonstrating that the disparity in pregnancy-related mortality for black and [American Indian] women is a complex national problem," the CDC writes.

Between the lines: There are often multiple contributing factors to a pregnancy-related death, stemming from differences in access to care, quality of care and the prevalence of chronic disease, per the report.

  • While 60% of pregnancy-related deaths are preventable, there's no significant differences in preventability based on race or ethnicity.

Go deeper: Most U.S. deaths from pregnancy complications are preventable

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Global child mortality rate continues decline

Children play with kites in a waste area in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Sept. 15, 2019. Photo: Syed Mahamudur Rahman/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Every 5 seconds a child under 15 years old died in 2018, mostly from preventable causes, according to the latest mortality trends report from 2 UN agencies.

The big picture: UNICEF and the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UNIGME) found the total number of deaths among children and adolescents under 15 years old has dropped by 56% since 1990 — from about 14.2 million to 6.2 million in 2018. Causes of death include treatable infectious diseases, nutritional causes, drowning, burns and injuries.

Go deeperArrowSep 19, 2019

Opioid crisis drives spike in Hepatitis C among pregnant women

Hepatitis C virus. Photo: BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The rate of pregnant women with Hepatitis C was 5 times higher in 2015 than in 2000 due to the substantial level of opioid abuse in the U.S., according to the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released Thursday.

The big picture: 68% of pregnant women with Hepatitis C have opioid use disorder. Overall cases of the virus almost tripled in the past few years, an effect of the opioid crisis and the unsanitary use of needles by drug users, CDC previously reported.

Go deeperArrowOct 3, 2019

Women’s World Cup earned more than 2x expected ad revenue

Photo: Naomi Baker - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images

In the midst of a bitter fight for equal pay, advertisers bought nearly $100 million in U.S. television commercials during the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: In response to pay gaps between USA men's and women's soccer, many argue male teams simply drive more revenue and therefore receive greater pay. The women's TV ad sales are arguably another point in dismissing that logic.

Go deeperArrowSep 16, 2019