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Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al-Than. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Qatari officials paid at least $275 million to get back hostages being held by Iraqi kidnappers, and an additional $150 million to "intermediaries," which the U.S. has designated as sponsors of international terrorism, the Washington Post's Joby Warrick reports.

Why it matters: Warrick writes that Qatar has "consistently denied reports that it paid terrorist organizations as part of the deal," but records obtained by the Post paint a different picture. President Trump spoke about how Qatar has stopped its funding of terrorism when Qatar's emir, Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, visited the White House earlier this month.

The details: Text messages and other records obtained by the Post reveal millions of dollars being set aside for, and paid to, Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, a Kata'ib Hezbollah boss, and Iranian and Iraqi officials.

  • Per WaPo, a senior Middle Eastern official said "the sums mentioned in the texts referred to proposals that were floated by negotiators but ultimately rejected."

Read the full Washington Post report here.

Go deeper

1 hour ago - World

Top Chinese diplomat warns Biden against meddling in country's affairs

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi. Photo: Greg Baker - Pool/Getty Images

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi in a speech on Sunday warned the U.S. against getting involved in China's "internal affairs," saying that "both sides need to abide by the principle of non-interference," CNBC reports.

Why it matters: Biden has promised a hardline approach with China. Tensions between the U.S. and China had heightened for years under the Trump administration.

America rebalances its post-Trump news diet

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Nearly halfway through President Biden's first 100 days, data shows that Americans are learning to wean themselves off of news — and especially politics.

Why it matters: The departure of former President Trump's once-ubiquitous presence in the news cycle has reoriented the country's attention.

Why migrants are fleeing their homes for the U.S.

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios Photo: Herika Martinez /Getty Images 

Natural disasters in Central America, economic devastation, gang wars, political oppression, and a new administration are all driving the sharp rise in U.S.-Mexico border crossings — a budding crisis for President Biden.

Why it matters: Migration flows are complex and quickly politicized. Biden's policies are likely sending signals that are encouraging the surge — but that's only a small reason it's happening.