Homeless people gather for a free coronavirus testing under an overpass in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on April 30. Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images

A 5.4 magnitude earthquake shook Tallaboa, Puerto Rico, on Saturday morning, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

The big picture: The earthquake is associated with a series of quakes that began in December, Governor Wanda Vázquez Garced tweeted, citing the Puerto Rico Seismic Network.

  • Earthquakes on the island killed at least one person, caused widespread power outages and displaced nearly 2,000 people.

Where it stands: The island is under lockdown with a strict curfew until the week of May 25 in response to the novel coronavirus. No casualties were immediately reported from Saturday's quake, the New York Times reports, citing the USGS.

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