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Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio (front, center). Photo: Megan Varner/Getty Images

Enrique Tarrio, leader of the far-right Proud boys accused of burning a church's Black Lives Matter banner, has been released from custody but ordered to stay away from Washington, D.C., until his next court appearance.

Why it matters: The order by D.C. Superior Court Magistrate Judge Renee Raymond banning him from the District of Columbia prevents him from legally attending Wednesday's Trump rally in D.C., when Congress is set to certify the electoral college votes. He may be arrested if he does.

The big picture: D.C. police charged Tarrio Monday night with destruction of property over the burning of the banner belonging to a historically Black church.

  • Officers found two unloaded high-powered magazines branded with the Proud Boys logo in his bag when they took him into custody, which Tarrio told police he intended to sell at the rally, court documents show.
  • He pleaded not guilty on Tuesday and is due to return to court on June 8.

Go deeper

Biden, activists decry "double standard" in police response to mob at U.S. Capitol

Mob members interact with Capitol Police inside the U.S. Capitol Building. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden joined Black Lives Matter activists and others in decrying what they said was a double standard in law enforcement's response to the mostly white mob that violently stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, compared to peaceful protesters calling for racial justice.

What he's saying: "If it had been a group of Black Lives Matter protesting yesterday ... they would have been treated very, very differently than the mob of thugs that stormed the Capitol. We all know that's true, and it is unacceptable."

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.

1 hour ago - Politics & Policy
Scoop

White House plots "full-court press" for $1.9 trillion relief plan

National Economic Council Director Brian Deese speaks during a White House news briefing. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Biden White House is deploying top officials to get a wide ideological spectrum of lawmakers, governors and mayors on board with the president’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: The broad, choreographed effort shows just how crucially Biden views the stimulus to the nation's recovery and his own political success.