Jan 28, 2020

Prosecutor: Prince Andrew has given zero cooperation on Epstein probe

Prince Andrew. Photo: Karwai Tang/WireImage)

Britain's Prince Andrew has so far provided federal prosecutors and the FBI "zero cooperation" in interviews regarding Jeffrey Epstein, prosecutor Geoffrey Berman said at a news conference Monday.

Why it matters: After stepping away from his royal duties in November, the prince said he was willing to help law enforcement investigations into Epstein and possible co-conspirators.

Context: During an interview with the BBC in November, Andrew denied having a sexual relationship with one of Epstein’s accusers, as she has claimed.

Go deeper: British police defend decision not to investigate Prince Andrew

Go deeper

Epstein survivor Courtney Wild to be a guest at State of the Union

Courtney Wild speaks at a July 2019 news conference in New York City. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Courtney Wild, who's spoken publicly of being molested by Jeffrey Epstein at age 14, will attend the State of the Union Tuesday as the guest of Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) a sponsor of a bill named for the survivor.

Why it matters: The Courtney Wild Crime Victims' Rights Reform Act of 2019 seeks to strengthen victims' rights and prevent prosecutors from reaching sweetheart plea deals like the 2008 one that saw Epstein avoid federal sex trafficking charges. Speier said Wild's presence will "send a clear message that women are done with being treated as second class citizens in our own country."

Go deeper: What we know: The life and death of Jeffrey Epstein

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle make first appearance since royal departure

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex depart Canada House on Jan. 07, 2020 in London, England. Photo: Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle made their first public appearance since stepping back from their royal duties at a JPMorgan event in Miami on Thursday, reports the New York Post.

Why it matters: As part of their agreement with Buckingham Palace, Harry and Meghan agreed to forego their royal titles and stop receiving public funds — in line with the couple's announcement that they plan to become "financially independent." The BBC notes that Harry spoke at the event, but it was not confirmed whether he was paid to appear.

Global #MeToo movement has resulted in 7 convictions, 4 charges of influential figures

Bill Cosby, Harvein Weinstein, and Larry Nassar. Photos: Gilbert Carrasquillo/Getty Images, Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images, and Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Hundreds of powerful people — predominately men — have been accused of sexual offenses since the #MeToo movement went viral in 2017. After film producer Harvey Weinstein's conviction, four of them face charges, while seven have been convicted.

Why it matters: The #MeToo movement focused global attention on previously unchecked sexual misconduct, leading at least 201 powerful men to lose jobs or major positions. But the movement, dubbed a global reckoning, has had few legal consequences for the accused. Here are some of the most notable cases.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 11, 2020 - Economy & Business