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Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images

Private equity firms Apollo Global Management and Värde Partners have agreed to acquire a 40.5% stake in OneMain Financial, the Indiana-based subprime lender spun off by Citigroup after the financial crisis, from Fortress Investment Group. No financial terms were disclosed, but earlier press reports suggested a sale price of between $1.5 billion and $2 billion.

Why it matters: OneMain is one of the shadow banking world's biggest players, having provided auto and other sorts of personal loans to millions of customers through more than 1,600 branches in 44 states.

Deal context: OneMain had initially sought a buyer for the entire company, but didn't find adequate takers. This deal provides an exit for Fortress, which perhaps was looking to shed some assets tied to its own acquisition by SoftBank (which closed last week).

Bottom line: "For Apollo, the deal represents a way to own a big chunk of OneMain without engaging in a full leveraged buyout, given that the company is already saddled with more than $14 billion in long-term debt." — Greg Roumeliotis, Reuters

Go deeper

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
16 mins ago - Economy & Business

The places regulation does not reach

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Financial regulation is not exactly simple anywhere in the world. But one country stands out for the sheer amount of complexity and confusion in its regulatory regime — the U.S.

Why it matters: Important companies fall through the cracks, largely unregulated, while others contend with a vast array of regulatory bodies, none of which are remotely predictable.

Trump nominee Christopher Waller confirmed to Fed board

Christopher Waller at a Senate Banking hearing earlier this year. (Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images)

The Senate voted 48-47 on Thursday to confirm Trump nominee Christopher Waller to the Federal Reserve Board of Governors — filling one of the two vacant slots on the influential economic body.

Why it matters: It's one of the last marks left on the Fed board by Trump, who has nominated five of its six members.

1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Boeing gets huge 737 Max order from Ryanair, boosting hope for quick rebound

Ryanair low cost airline Boeing 737-800 aircraft as seen over the runway. Photo by Nik Oiko/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Dublin-based Ryanair said it would add 75 more planes to an existing order for Boeing's 737 Max airplanes, a giant vote of confidence as Boeing seeks to revive sales of its best-selling plane after a 20-month safety ban following two fatal crashes.

The big picture: Ryanair's big order, on the heels of breakthrough vaccine news, is also a promising sign that the devastated airline industry might recover from the global pandemic sooner than expected.

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