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Voting in Kentucky. Photo: Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

There are plenty of votes left to be counted, but a few trend lines from Tuesday's primary elections are worthy of your time:

  1. The AOC-backed Justice Democrats showed considerable strength.
  2. President Trump's endorsement wasn't worth its weight in gold.
  3. The absentee balloting process will require a reset in expectations.
  4. America needs young people to step up as polling workers.

The big picture: The U.S. is less than five months from an election, and the lasting visual from last night was the crowd of Black voters pounding on the doors of a polling center, let in only because of a judge's emergency injunction.

In New York's Democratic primaries, 16-term Rep. Eliot Engel is trailing middle school principal Jamaal Bowman, who was backed by AOC.

  • "In 2018, Dem voters showed an unprecedented desire to nominate women. In 2020, we're witnessing another sea change in desire, this time towards Black candidates," tweeted Dave Wasserman of the nonpartisan Cook Political Report.
  • 14-term Rep. Carolyn Maloney has a narrow lead, although she said it should widen.

Between the lines: The New York races might not be called today because of absentee ballots, which are in huge demand because of COVID-19.

  • Expect a similar trend in November, and don't be surprised if there isn't a winner on election night, or even the day after.

In North Carolina's Republican primary, President Trump suffered a surprise defeat in the race to fill the seat vacated by his chief of staff Mark Meadows.

  • The loss was only the second endorsement in a Republican primary where Trump came out on the losing end.
  • As Axios' Jonathan Swan reported today, Trump was persuaded into the endorsement by Meadows' wife, and the decision angered House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

The bottom line: If you're young and healthy, now would be a very good time to step up as a poll worker.

Go deeper

Cook Political Report moves Ohio and Iowa from "lean Republican" to "toss up" in 2020 race

Photos: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images; Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Cook Political Report shifted Tuesday its 2020 presidential election outlook for Ohio and Iowa — two key battleground states that President Trump won in 2016 — moving them from "lean Republican" to "toss up."

Why it matters: It represents a further narrowing of the electoral map for Trump with only five weeks until Election Day, especially because Cook projects that neither state is currently a decisive tipping point for Joe Biden.

Judges rule for mail-in voting in Montana and Alabama

Two federal judges ruled on Wednesday in favor of plans in Montana and Alabama for mail-in and absentee voting in November's elections.

Driving the news: In Montana, U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen, ruled in favor of the mail-in voting expansion plans of Gov. Steve Bullock (D) to safeguard against COVID-19. In response to claims by the Trump Campaign and the Republican National Committee of widespread voter fraud, he wrote, "The evidence suggests ... this allegation, specifically in Montana, is a fiction."

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.